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Latin Showdown: “El Gallo Bravo” Ready for Return to the Ring

  Latin Showdown: “El Gallo Bravo” Ready for Return to the Ring Original Article: http://hardcoreboxing.net/8countpro_1082004.htm Further details of LATIN SHOWDOWN, Chicagoland’s biggest professional boxing card of 2004 have been announced as Dominic Pesoli’s 8 Count Productions and Bob Arum’s Top Rank Incorporated along with Miller Lite returns to Hawthorne Race Course on Friday, October 15th. This […]

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Latin Showdown: “El Gallo Bravo” Ready for Return to the Ring
Original Article: http://hardcoreboxing.net/8countpro_1082004.htm

Further details of LATIN SHOWDOWN, Chicagoland’s biggest professional boxing card of 2004 have been announced as Dominic Pesoli’s 8 Count Productions and Bob Arum’s Top Rank Incorporated along with Miller Lite returns to Hawthorne Race Course on Friday, October 15th. This marks the second straight month that Telefutura’s internationally broadcast Friday night boxing series originates from the South Side of Chicago.

The Hawthorne Race Course is located at 35th and Laramie, just minutes from both the Stevenson and Eisenhower expressways. Doors for this internationally televised event open at 6pm, with the first bell at 7pm. Tickets, starting at $25 are available now by calling 312-226-5800. For this event, the very spacious second floor ballroom at the Hawthorne Race Course will be used to allow for the expected large audience.

Dr. Stoxen (left) with Miguel Hernandez (right)

Headlining the live, internationally televised action packed card is the return to Chicago of Mexican legend, former world champion, Cesar Bazan, 43-6-1 (20KO’s) of Mexico City, Mexico in a ten round welterweight battle against tough veteran Francisco Campos, 17-1-1 (9KO’s) of Cartago, Costa Rica. Bazan made his first appearance in Chicago this past February in a fight shortened by his opponent’s continual low blows resulting in a second round disqualification win for Bazan in front of a packed DePaul Athletic Center of 3,500 local fight fans.

Just announced is a terrific co-headlining bout featuring Illinois State Middleweight Champion “Macho” Miguel Hernandez, 13-1 (8KO’s) and the highly skilled Texan, Victor Lares, 8-1 (2KO’s) of Corpus Christi in a scheduled eight rounder.

Also just added to the card is the return of welterweight fan favorite Luciano “EL GALLO BRAVO” Perez, 9-1 (8KO’s) in a scheduled six rounder against Joseph Pujoe, 3-2-1 of Gary, IN. Speaking after a long sparring session at JABB Boxing Gym, Luciano said “the last fight was very tough, but I look forward to putting on a terrific show for the huge 8 Count crowd. I wasn’t at my best last time and need to get back in the winning column. Buendia was tough, but I can do better and I’d like to fight him again.” Perez also promised a full mariachi band as part of his walk to the ring on October 15th.

Speaking of Pujoe, Dominic Pesoli, President of 8 Count Productions said, “I just saw him fight in Merrillville, IN a couple of weeks back. He had been off for a couple of years, but he looked very good winning a six round decision. Luciano’s facing a tough guy, but that’s how we do things–there’s no easy fights at an 8 Count event.”

Other bouts on the card include the Chicagoland middleweight cross-town showdown between David “The Weasal” Estrada, 6-1 (4KO’s) and Michael “The Midnight Stalker” Walker, 4-0 (4KO’s) of One in a Million Promotions, in a scheduled six rounder.

A four round featherweight bout features local newcomers, Frankie Tafoya, 1-0 (1KO) and Omar Reyes, making his pro debut.

Other local favorites appearing on the card include middleweight Don “DA Bomb” George, 2-0 (2KO’s) and “Hurricane” Ivan Rodriguez, 1-0 (1KO) in separate four rounders.

In a special feature women’s bout, newcomers Rita Figueroa and Courtney Elliott will battle in a scheduled four round junior welterweight bout.

Dr James Stoxen DC at Team Doctors

The weigh-in will be held at the Grand Opening of the new TEAM DOCTORS location at 6432 S. Pulaski on the southwest side of Chicago at 7pm on Thursday, October 14th. Team Doctors and Dr. James Stoxen handle many of Chicago’s finest athletes including a large number of professional and amateur boxers. More information can be obtained by visiting their expansive website at www.teamdoctors.org

Open for only ten months, JABB Boxing Gym has quickly become the premier workout location for an array of professional and amateur boxers as well as a large contingent of those looking to stay in great shop through their multitude of classes, camps and private lessons. JABB Boxing Gym is located at 410 N. Oakley on the near northwest side of Chicago. Visit their terrific new website at www.jabbboxing.com

Dr. James Stoxen DC talking about the first meeting with Wiggles Founder Anthony Field On G-Spot Radio 106.3 Sundays

  Live Video Radio Interview:   Dr. James Stoxen DC with George Daniels and Caryn Lee 106.3 FM WSRB-SOUL The G-Spot Radio Show Sunday, March 18, 2012 Watch this lighthearted yet informative video radio interview.    

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Live Video Radio Interview:  
Dr. James Stoxen DC with
George Daniels and Caryn Lee
106.3 FM WSRB-SOUL
The G-Spot Radio Show
Sunday, March 18, 2012

Watch this lighthearted yet informative video radio interview.

George Daniels and Caryn Lee

 

In the Studio with George Daniels and Dr. James Stoxen DC

 


Wiggles Founder, Anthony Field Shares Personal Insight During ‘Good Reading Magazine Blog’ Interview

  Q & A With Anthony Field Good Reading Magazine Blog March 27, 2012 Anthony Field is the creator and a founding member of the global phenomenon that is The Wiggles. Born in 1963 the youngest of seven children, he grew up in Sydney’s western suburbs. Anthony and his brothers Paul and John and purple Wiggle Jeff were members […]

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Q & A With Anthony Field
Good Reading Magazine Blog
March 27, 2012

Anthony Field is the creator and a founding member of the global phenomenon that is The Wiggles. Born in 1963 the youngest of seven children, he grew up in Sydney’s western suburbs. Anthony and his brothers Paul and John and purple Wiggle Jeff were members of the ′80s chart topping group The Cockroaches.

For the first time, Anthony tells his inspiring, behind-the-scenes story of how he overcame depression, life-threatening illness and chronic pain to get his life back.

Q: What were some of your favourite books when you were growing up?

Anthony: Well I would have to say Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl and The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith by Thomas Keneally.

Q: As the blue Wiggle, you obviously lead a pretty busy life. What books do you like to read to wind down and relax?

Anthony: Meditation books by Jean Vanier, my fave would be The Broken Body. I love biographies too.

Q: Are there any particular moments in your extensive career that stand out above the rest?

Anthony: The first few years, when we were loading in the PA system, driving ourselves miles and miles to do a show, playing ourselves and the characters, meeting people who had never heard of us, it was all very exciting.

Q: What books do you and your children like to read together?

Anthony: Well they are still very young, but they love Anthony Browne picture books and my oldest, Lucia, 8, loves ‘Ripley’s Believe It or Not!’ books.

Q: What can you tell us about your new book ‘How I got my Wiggle Back’? What led to its creation?

How I Got My Wiggle Back

Anthony: I was so thankful to the health professionals who saved my life and inspired me to work to become pain free. I wanted to produce a book which showed the world some natural cures and thanked these great healers.

Q: What would you like your readers to take away from How I got my Wiggle Back?

Anthony: That good health and a pain free existence are available to most people naturally. Yes you have to work at it, and yes you have to make lifestyle changes, but it will be worth it.

Q: How I got my Wiggle Back is quite a revealing and yet inspiring look into your personal struggles. What challenges did you face while writing your book?

Anthony: I couldn’t and wouldn’t delve too far back into some painful times, which I think really contributed to my clinical depression in later life.

Q: Who would you say have been the most inspirational people in your life?

Anthony: My parents, my fellow Wiggles, the doctors in the book and lately, famous Greek photographer Spiros Poros, whom has taken me under his wing and really helped me see things in a real Greek philosophical way.

Q: Can we expect another book in the future?

Anthony: I would love to write a book about some of the fun and inspiring people we have met on the road in the last 21 years, some funny stories, heart-warming stories and sadly some heartbreaking ones involving children with terrible diseases.

Q: Do you have any advice that you would like to offer to your readers?

Anthony: Health and happiness are attainable and yet they can be transient. Natural is best in diet and exercise. Take the steps, educate yourself on how our marvelous bodies work, respect your bodies and give them the best fuel and lots of rest. Enjoy life and love.

 

Video Tutorial # 113 Acute VS. Chronic Conditions In Running

  In this post I will talk about how acute injuries are treated differently from chronic injuries to a point. Some acute injuries are a result of a chronic manifestation of internal forces on the human spring because of a subtle abnormal movement pattern developed by some sort of deviation from a normal like pair […]

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In this post I will talk about how acute injuries are treated differently from chronic injuries to a point.

Some acute injuries are a result of a chronic manifestation of internal forces on the human spring because of a subtle abnormal movement pattern developed by some sort of deviation from a normal like pair of shoes. Standing on your feet too long or some kind of activity you do on one side of your body might also be the cause.

They have the internal forces that develop in your body and then when you increase the force of the tax or lifting internal force comes out more as ‘the straw that broke the camel’s back’.

I love this video because even though it’s not funny when someone has an acute injury like this dynamic treadmill, we make light of these acute injuries as if that’s the thing that shuts us down more often than anything.

You hear about the story of how your grandpa or your dad was once a great athlete and he told you that he would’ve gone pro if it wasn’t for that injury that took him out.

Life certainly changes when you have an acute injury that takes you out of commission.  It turns our activity list into the can’t do this and they used to be able to do’s.
I used to be able to do that before I had the injury but  now I can’t anymore.

In Anthony Fields book, how I got my wiggle back, he talks about how life turns into the before and afters. Before he herniated his disc he could do anything, he was indestructible. He was an infantry man.  After he herniated his disc,  his body deteriorated and  over time he could not do much of anything not even dance and at times he couldn’t walk.

Acute injuries can certainly lay us out for good but most don’t.

What’s the difference between those who recover fully and can do everything they used to be able to do and those who cannot?

For those who can’t do those things anymore it’s  because they did not recover from their injuries.  Something was getting in the way of the healing process. Once we figure out what is getting in the way of the healing process and remove it then we can recover fully and completely. In Anthony’s case what was getting in the way of the healing process was a locked human spring mechanism, detected on the gait evaluation and the evaluation that was done backstage in 2004.

There’s a lot of things we used to be able to do when we were kids like run barefoot. Some of us cannot run barefoot anymore.

I turned 50 years old in February and I’m running barefoot no problem, no pain, no injuries.

What can’t you do now because of injuries?

People ask me as a doctor in the entertainment industry having been invited to treat top level entertainers and their handlers at over 130 concerts as their backstage Dr. what exactly is it that I do back there?

Do I wait for some accident to happen just in case someone gets hurt and then come in and treat them? No I tell them that’s a pretty useless job standing there waiting for an accident to happen.

People don’t understand that the majority of painful conditions and problems with performance levels for maximum level performance are due to a weakness and or locking of the human spring mechanism. The celebrity performers and top athletes have figured that out. That’s what I get hired to do, release the human spring mechanism.

releasing the human spring mechanism allows the human body to move smoother, with an increase spring and decreases the risk of injury. By maintaining your human spring mechanism to the highest level of its performance capabilities it can be in top performance may decrease injuries keeping you in top shape longer

Injuries can come from a slight abnormal movement pattern that causes stress and strain in the Human Spring  Mechanism  leading to abnormal wear and tear and a release of inflammation and eventually could end up becoming a painful condition

So, no I don’t sit backstage all day from 4 PM till one in the morning working with these top entertainers just waiting for an injury to happen.  I’m working 10 hours straight without breaks sometimes just releasing internal forces from the human spring by making necessary adjustments on the joints for the hard and releasing muscle tension from the human spring.

There’s no secret to becoming a celebrity doctor or doctor to the stars. Really what it boils down to is having a treatment approach that works for in getting the results that they’re looking for more than what they expected. This is what I shoot for in my work. I call it the WOW factor. My goal is to have them say wow when they get up from the table.

My recommendation is that you take a look at what the human Spring approach can do for you and find your WOW.

Video Tutorial # 162 How does the Human Spring Work to Absorb Impacts Without Cushion Footwear? My Research

  These photos come from slow motion videos I did of a barefoot runner. The arch is like a spring; it has 26 bones in the foot, 33 joints and even a spring ligament. Arch “Leaf Spring” Bend Creates Energy When your body weight comes down it sits primarily on the first and second toe; […]

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These photos come from slow motion videos I did of a barefoot runner.

The arch is like a spring; it has 26 bones in the foot, 33 joints and even a spring ligament.

Arch “Leaf Spring” Bend Creates Energy

When your body weight comes down it sits primarily on the first and second toe; the remaining three toes, number three through five work as guides.

When the weight hit’s the arch, the arch bends as it descends a couple millimeters to a couple centimeters in the middle, absorbs in the spring, energy is loaded into the arch and entire human spring and ascends as it springs off as it unloading this energy to propel you forward.

 

As the arch leaf spring sinks the cuff muscles that suspend the leaf spring of the arch, stretch down to absorb the weight into the spring. This stretching is like the stretching of a bungee cord or rubber bands. How far it sinks down or descends or how much they stretch and how strong the stretch energy is will depend on how much energy they give back to the spring off.

Therefore the human foot can have pound weight categories like like a bow and arrow. The bow has different bow weights much the same as a spring that is designed stronger for a truck than it is for a motorcycle.

How far the arch springs down depends on how much weight is being and how fast the weight is being loaded on the arch. For example, the load that is placed on the arch is different from walking, running, sprinting or jumping down from various heights and weights.

When the foot lands the toes spread for a wider plant of the foot so it can have better balance and load distribution to be spread over a wider surface.

Also how far the arch descends depends on the environmental issues. If the foot is cold, it will stiffen and won’t descend as far as if the foot is warmed up.

This video clip was taken from the presentation:
Run For Life, Barefoot by Dr James Stoxen DC
At The 2nd Annual Bangkok Congress On Anti-Aging And Regenerative Medicine
Bangkok, Thailand, September 4th, 2010

Video Tutorial # 154 Barefoot or Shod? Which one is better? The debate!

  My presentation is titled ‘Run For Life, Barefoot’ because the shoe industry is promoting the various different high-tech implements and the adjustments to the human foot. The foot is perfect when we’re born and they’re making these claims that wearing their shoes will make you a better runner, it is safer and you will […]

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My presentation is titled ‘Run For Life, Barefoot’ because the shoe industry is promoting the various different high-tech implements and the adjustments to the human foot.

The foot is perfect when we’re born and they’re making these claims that wearing their shoes will make you a better runner, it is safer and you will be able to run a for a lifetime.

They market the shoes as some sort of anti-aging device or something that will allow you to prevent injuries.

In reality 30 years ago they recommended all of these cushioning devices and now they are backtracking, backpedaling and you see these new barefoot running shoes, if there is such a thing. Promoting barefoot running and people are going back to nature.

So in reality, what is right?

As doctors we have determined that because we have advised our patients properly.

Patients should not be advised by the person that sells the shoes in the stores because they don’t have medical training to evaluate what your body needs.

The people doing research should advise patients and we must conduct more research.

We need to look at this very carefully.

Current Standard of Care

This is my story I would like to add:

who’s right?

First they say use shoes with maximum cushion

Then they say use shoes with no cushion

Then they say use no shoes at all or go barefoot?

Who is right?

Why don’t we look at the shoes worn by athletes that compete in different running events

Cross country running shoes… (Talk about the design of those and why they are designed that way)

Sprinters shoes (talk about the design of those and why they are designed that way)

Running shoes for everyone else – (talk about the standard running shoe design and why they are designed that way)

Talk about barefoot shoes and why they are designed that way

Which one is right?

In 2007 I was invited to give a lecture in Japan at the world Congress of aging in Tokyo. In the audience was the director for product development for Converse Japan, Dan Weiss.

Dan came to my lecture but after the presentation he invited me to meet with executives of the converse–Japan operation at their headquarters in Tokyo.

They asked me to give them a take on the book where industry and how it relates to my approach to the human body and the human foot is a giant spring mechanism rather than the lever system. The purpose was obviously to determine if there was a better design for footwear at that time.

I remember how wide-eyed my daughter was at the time being 12 years old looking over the fancy Converse Japan footwear designs wondering if she could get a few pairs to take home. Thank God Dan was a father of a young girl and realized how important it was for my daughter to have some of those fashion conscious shoes. What makes it cool for her was that these Japanese designs and styles were not available in the United States.  Subsequently she was the only one in her school with these special Japanese design Converse shoes

When I started to go into my 15 minute discussion of the human spring mechanism and the way the human foot attenuates impacts and how footwear affects the human foot, at the end of the meeting the executives asked me what kind of shoe would I recommend.

What I said shocked them.

My recommendation was to develop a shoe that was all you needed and nothing more. Low tech light weight and nothing fancy.

They looked at me in a state of shock . Of course I was shocked that they were shocked but nothing shocks me anymore about the way the footwear industry is run.

It’s a $25 billion industry where no one can agree on what looks best and what is the most healthy and frankly most companies could care less whether the footwear is healthy for you are not.

In fact when I attended the global footwear conference in Düsseldorf Germany only one footwear company from Germany actually discussed with me the health benefits of their footwear out of the hundreds of exhibits that I visited.

So yes it’s confusing to say the least of what footwear to wear. In fact each time you change footwear styles your brain has to learn a new pattern of movement. the movement pattern has to be changed and the current pattern of movement that has been stored in the brain, now that it’s comfortable.

So how do you avoid such confusion both to yourself and to your brain?

I say make the leap into barefoot running! 

Dr. James Stoxen DC Barefoot Running

The reason is to develop one paranormal movement that is perfect for your foot and whatever shoe you have combined with the foot.

Your brain learns one perfect pattern of movement. If there’s pain or some sort of condition that develops by running the only thing you have to be concerned with is your form and technique. When you wear various running shoes with different implements you have to weigh too many variables to sort through adding to the confusion of what you need to do to be able to run without pain.

Is it the high heel of the shock? Is it the curve last? Is it that toe lift? Is the shoe the right size in the fore-foot? Is that heel cup strong enough to prevent over pronation?

Literally you could go through eight or 10 pairs of shoes with different attributes and styles and all 10 could be useless to help you run pain-free.

The problem isn’t your shoe. The most likely problem you has come from wearing and tearing and breaking down of the Human Spring. The most likely reason for why you cannot absorb the shock of the landing and have normal stress and strain free biomechanics is because the issue is binding and weakening your spring. The problem is the foot cannot absorb the impact of the landings.

So if you take your shoes off and work on your foot to release your human spring to be able to have a foot and intact spring then you will be able to absorb the impact without the benefit of an artificial cushion–spring mechanism and then it was strength in the spring suspension system to be able to absorb the impacts of standing, walking, jogging, running and then eventually sprinting forces.

You have to practice taking impacts by increasing the forces of impacts to allow the foot to adapt to these increasing impacts of various different angles called spring training or plyometrics then eventually you can run without having to worry about what shoes are best.

Once you learn how to barefoot run you don’t have as many other variables to be concerned about except form and technique.

This video tutorial was taken from the lecture:

Run For Life! Barefoot 
Presented by Dr James Stoxen DC
The 8th Annual Malaysian Conference And Exhibition On Anti-Aging, Aesthetic And Regenerative Medicine
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
April 30 — May 2, 2011

Video Tutorial # 159 – Foot Lock! What You Get From Standing Too Long And How To Prevent It

I have been standing in these shoes all day! My Feet Hurt! Maybe the pain will go away……. Those are six very dangerous words, maybe the pain will go away…. An activity as simple as standing all day can lead to pain in your feet. So you need to know how to protect your feet when you’re stuck […]

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I have been standing in these shoes all day! My Feet Hurt! Maybe the pain will go away…….

Those are six very dangerous words, maybe the pain will go away….

An activity as simple as standing all day can lead to pain in your feet. So you need to know how to protect your feet when you’re stuck standing for hours on end, especially on a hard surface.

Besides the stress of prolonged standing, the architecture of the foot can also increase the symptoms from pre-existing conditions: Plantar fasciitis refers to the inflammation of the fascia under the heel. Flat or tilted feet (from heel pronation) and bony spurs in the base of the ankle may make the condition worse. Achilles tendonitis results from over stretching of the Achilles tendon. Bunions at the side of the big toe may arise because of heel pronation and may be aggravated by narrow shoe boxes (the area in front of the shoe) and prolonged standing. Corns on top of the toes may be aggravated by scraping against the inside of your shoe.

WHAT ARE POSSIBLE HEALTH SYMPTOMS FROM STANDING ON YOUR FEET TOO LONG?

The most common symptom from prolonged standing on your feet, and usually the first to occur, is discomfort and fatigue in the legs.

The closer the body part is to the ground, the more likely it will be affected by prolonged standing (i.e. the feet are most often affected, followed by the shins and calves, followed by the knees, thighs, hips and low back). However, symptoms from working on your feet may reach to the top of your body. In some studies neck pain symptoms have been related to prolonged standing at work!

Beyond simple fatigue and discomfort, more serious health effects can result from working on your feet for long hours.

In lab experiments people could not distinguish fatigue in their legs from whole-body fatigue. Therefore, that whole-body fatigue feeling could be related to working on your feet.

Some of these are: Low Back Pain, Painful feet and other foot problems, Plantar Fasciitis and Heel Spurs, Orthopedic changes in the feet (e.g. flat feet), Restricted blood flow, Swelling in the feet and legs, Varicose veins, Increased chance of arthritis in the knees and hips

WHAT CAUSES THESE PROBLEMS?

Joint compression: Gravity squeezes your joints under the weight of your body. Each body part is compressed by all of the sections of the body above it. (For example, your hips are compressed by your head, arms and torso, but your feet are compressed by the weight of your whole body!)

Compressing a joint is like squeezing a sponge – body fluids are squeezed out of the space in the joint. Without body fluids and circulation, your joints become malnourished, and cannot continue to support the weight of your body. Wear and tear of body parts occurs.

Postural muscle fatigue: Postural muscles keep your body from falling over while you’re standing. Standing for a long time forces these muscles to work without a rest. Without rest these muscles become exhausted, resulting in pain.

These effects are like working without lunch. Joints and muscles get their “lunch” from circulation, and need rest breaks to recoup from bouts of work. Think how you would feel without lunch!

Insufficient venous blood return in the legs: Gravity pulls blood down into your feet. One way that blood is pushed back up to your heart is through cyclic muscle contractions, often called a “muscle pump“. If the muscles are engaged in one long contraction (sustained contraction) to keep you standing, they cannot produce a ‘muscle pump” effect. Continuous muscle contractions also hinder circulation of body fluids.

Keeping the body in an upright position requires considerable muscular effort that is particularly unhealthy even while standing motionless. It effectively reduces the blood supply to the loaded muscles. Insufficient blood flow accelerates the onset of fatigue and causes pain in the muscles of the legs, back and neck (these are the muscles used to maintain an upright position).

Standing too long not only produces muscular strain but other discomforts also. Prolonged and frequent standing, without some relief by walking, causes blood pooling in the legs and feet. When standing occurs continually over prolonged periods, it can result in inflammation of the veins. This inflammation may progress over time to chronic and painful varicose veins. Excessive standing also causes the joints in the spine, hips, knees and feet to become temporarily immobilized or locked. This immobility can later lead to rheumatic diseases due to degenerative damage to the tendons and ligaments (the structures that bind muscles to bones)

In my practice, I work 90 hours a week on average.  What is worse is that I am standing on my feet the entire time.

How do I do that and still run barefoot?

Dr James Stoxen DC at Team Doctors

If someone should have an excuse for why they can’t run or run barefoot it should be me.

This is my typical week:

I practice about 12 hours a day from 9:00am in the morning to 9:00pm at night, minimum five days a week.  At least 3 nights a week I am working on my feet until midnight on a VIP client.  I work at least one full day if not two on my feet on the weekends.

When you’re on your feet for an extended period of time, the muscles that suspend your feet or the spring suspension system muscles are in a sustained contraction that has to be maintained for a certain amount time.

What is sustained contraction and how does it lock your joints and specifically the human spring?

An example would be holding a glass of water in my hand. Although I can do this easily.

If I hold it for too long in a sustained contraction I am going to get tired.  My arms will have an inflammatory reaction and be stiff.  The stiffness can even lock up your joints.

What is foot lock?

The foot and ankle has 33 movable joints to allow the force of the landings to be spread out over these joints for a smoother landing.

When the foot locks in any one of the 33 joints this causes a less smooth landing and a compensation for the normal motion.  Any abnormal motion in the foot will cause an abnormal motion in the entire flooring system of the 7 floors of human spring which eventually locks.

Do we see this clinically?  Of course!

To think any different defies the laws of gravity, engineering and physics.

Can weakness in the suspension system muscles lead to a locked human spring?

  • Standing on your feet all day leads to fatigue of the spring suspension system muscles which determines your ability to resist impacts of walking, recycle energy through the spring and provides for healthy movement.
  • Stiffness in the spring suspension system muscles eventually leads to stiffness or locking of some of the 33 joints of the foot and ankle.
  • When the human spring is locked at the foundation, the body compensates with abnormal motion through the entire seven floor human spring.
  • Abnormal motion in moving parts leads to stress and strain of the muscles, ligaments and tendons that guide the movement of the bones and joints.
  • Abnormal stress and strain leads to wear and tear of the joints.
  • Wear and tear leads to the release of inflammation.
  • The release of inflammation leads to pain, fatigue and accelerated aging of the musculoskeletal system and other systems of the body.
  • High levels of inflammation (cytokines) have also been strongly linked to feelings of depression. 

This is true when YOU stand too long.

The sustained contraction can lock the spring mechanism.  The spring mechanism loses spring mobility and may not be as effective in springing our bodies off the ground upon impact from the forces of the landings.

We were designed to function optimally if we keep moving so that the spring suspension doesn’t settle, drop and lock.

The theory states that once your foot and kinematic spring chain lock then the body bangs into the ground instead of springing off the ground. The landing becomes a bang and twist instead of a spring and roll. (see below)

 

Locked Spring and Spring Walking

When you stand too long your muscles have a sustained contraction similar to what happens when you hold anything in one position with your muscles contracted continuously.

What happens next is your arch linkage drops and eventually can lock. What I have found is that the arch drops and locks primarily at the second metatarsal cuneiform joint and the third. For those of you who are not doctors that is around the middle of the foot.

People know me as the “anti-shoe” doctor and the “barefoot running” doctor.

Ideally we should be shoeless and constantly moving like our ancestors were.

Click here to read Was My Chronic Pain, Fatigue, Fibromyalgia Cured with a Pair Of Shoes? NO! 

So why does a barefoot running doctor recommend shoes in some instances?

That’s because we are supposed to keep moving for optimal use of our spring mechanism. When we keep moving we keep springing.

Some of us might think that healthy movement for the human spring mechanism is in the direction that stimulates development of the spring muscles that spring you forward as in running straight. This would be similar to someone doing the bench press and curls in weightlifting.

We used to see athletes only doing bench press and curls in the gym and we know what happened to those athletes.  They got shoulder, back and neck conditions as well as injuries.

Then someone came up with the bright idea that we had to exercise muscles that control the movements of all the joints in all ranges of motion. That way we could develop a more balanced joint motion and strength.

Running training in my opinion is still in the dark ages of development. Many of us still run straight ahead with little to no directional changes. That is, in my opinion, why many of you have conditions related to imbalances of strength in the spring suspension system.

Experts throw the concept of over pronation (over rolling of the foot into the unsafe range inward) and over supination (over rolling of the foot into the unsafe range outward) What is actually being described is the position of the foot at the impact point and through the point when it pushes off.

For those who understand training bone and joint position is controlled by muscle strength.

muscle strength is important to maintain the bones in the position during standing, walking impact forces, running impact forces and endurance strength for many impacts.

If you are running you must run drills in all directions the foot and body moves for a balanced spring mechanism to withstand the impact forces.

This comes directly from the book Supertraining by Siff and Verhkoshansky:

MECHANICAL LOADING OF COLLAGENOUS TISSUE:

(page 41)Since stretching is a particular type of mechanical loading, application of stretching can be more effectively applied if the effects of the loading on collagen are studied carefully.  In fact physiological stretch of this possible because collagen and is a viscoelastic material that is, under rapid loading it behaves elastically while under gradual loading it is viscous and can deform plasticity.

(page 42) Since tendons and ligaments are viscoelastic, they also exhibit sensitivity to loading rate, and undergoes stress relaxation, creep and hysteresis.   Prolonged and excessive stretching of this type encourages joint mobility at the expense of its stability sold at a joint then has to rely more on its muscles for stability. Despite the widespread opinion that the muscles act as efficient synergistic stabilizers, it should be remembered that the musculature cannot respond quickly enough to protect a joint against injury if large impacts are applied rapidly, particularly Lee if they are torsional since joint stability involves three-dimensional actions over several degrees of freedom, the necessity for appropriately conditioned in all the interacting soft tissues becomes obvious.

 

Plasticity defined in physics from Wikipedia below:

In physics and materials science plasticity describes the deformation of a material undergoing non-reversible changes of shape in response to applied forces.[1] For example, a solid piece of metal being bent or pounded into a new shape displays plasticity as permanent changes occur within the material itself. In engineering, the transition from elastic behavior to plastic behavior is called yield.

Plastic deformation is observed in most materials including metals, soils, rocks, concrete, foams, bone and skin. However, the physical mechanisms that cause plastic deformation can vary widely. At the crystal scale, plasticity in metals is usually a consequence of dislocations. In most crystalline materials such defects are relatively rare. In brittle materials such as rock, concrete, and bone, plasticity is caused predominantly by slip at microcracks.

For many ductile metals tensile loading applied to a sample will cause it to behave in an elastic manner. Each increment of load is accompanied by a proportional increment in extension, and when the load is removed, the piece returns exactly to its original size. However, once the load exceeds some threshold (the yield strength), the extension increases more rapidly than in the elastic region, and when the load is removed, some amount of the extension remains.

However, elastic deformation is an approximation and its quality depends on the considered time frame and loading speed. If the deformation behavior includes elastic deformation as indicated in the adjacent graph it is also often referred to as elastic-plastic or elasto-plastic deformation.

Perfect plasticity is a property of materials to undergo irreversible deformation without any increase in stresses or loads. Plastic materials with hardening necessitate increasingly higher stresses to result in further plastic deformation. Generally plastic deformation is also dependent on the deformation speed, i.e. usually higher stresses have to be applied to increase the rate of deformation and such materials are said to deform visco-plasticity.

Flow Plasticity theory, uses a set of non-linear, non-integrable equations to describe the set of changes on strain and stress with respect to a previous state and a small increase of deformation.

If the stress exceeds a critical value, as was mentioned above, the material will undergo plastic, or irreversible, deformation. This critical stress can be tensile or compressive. The Tresca and the von Mises criteria are commonly used to determine whether a material has yielded.

DEFORMATION THEORY:

There are several mathematical descriptions of plasticity. One is deformation theory (see e.g. Hookes Law where the stress tensor (of order d in d dimensions) is a function of the strain tensor. Although this description is accurate when a small part of matter is subjected to increasing loading (such as strain loading), this theory cannot account for irreversibility.

Ductile materials can sustain large plastic deformations without fracture. However, even ductile metals will fracture when the strain becomes large enough – this is as a result of work hardening of the material, which causes it to become brittle. Heat treatment such as annealing can restore the ductility of a worked piece, so that shaping can continue.

Science tells us that standing for a long time and even slowly delivered impacts can stress tendons, joints and other tissues to deform their shape weakening the stability and performance.  They can be referred to as plastic deformity vs elastic deformity.

In fact sports research found that the shorter the contact time of your foot or bodyweight on the ground the more it improves performance.

Its obvious that standing for a long time is really damaging to our joints!

If the muscles which maintain the foot in the safe range from supination to pronation are not able to maintain them in the safe range then we have to strengthen them.

You would think that athletes would be able to maintain the foot in the safe range during standing for long periods of time.

IN other words if an athlete works all day standing as a teller in a bank they could do it no problem.

If you gave a typical woman’s purse to an athlete and told him to hold it in the 90 degree curl position for 20 minutes he or she would be feeling the strain of the constant contraction burning in the muscles and the strain on the joints as they compressed from the constant pulling and the attachment of the tendons to bones. Pretty soon if it was left long enough they would end up with a condition that had to be treated.

There is no difference with constant contraction related to standing in one position for too long.

Ok, we understand that and I realized long ago this was a problem for me as I stand for long periods of time in one position treating patients. This is especially true when I’m performing one of my pain exorcisms which is body work to release spasms that compress joints from the foot to the head lasting sometimes 2 – 10 hours on one patient.

Tip One:

– Rock and Roll The Feet – What I try to do is rock back and forth into supination and pronation.  This keeps your muscles contracting and not stagnating into fatigue.  Sometimes I get distracted and forget.

When I forget then the fatigue sets in and my foot starts rolling out of the safe range.

Supination to Pronation, Safe and Unsafe Range

What I have found is that once the spring suspension system muscles fatigue on me my foot will roll either in or out of the safe range either over pronation (85% of the population) or over supination (15% of the population) as a compensation and due to weakness.

What I found as the best way to balance this negative is to find a shoe that kept my foot in the safe range as long as possible until I could get off my feet and release the muscle tension and fatigue.

Tip Two:

- I wear a shoe with a very strong reinforced counter support.

Shoe Safe and Unsafe Zone

I have also found some footwear with an extended medial counter support that may extend 2 – 4 inches across the sides of the heel to keep the heel from rolling out of the safe range.

The other important feature I like in my shoes are those with a hard plastic encased inside the leather as a reinforcement.

This is especially important for those who are on their feet for a long time, those of you who see their feet roll out of the safe range or have been told they have over pronation of the feet or over supination of the feet.

Also, many of you who are a  little or a lot bigger (you know who you are) and those who have big feet, should seek out the extended medial counter shoe.

It’s interesting that shoe companies design shoes of a size 8 with the same counter support material as a shoe size 14.  Dont they realize that a man or woman with a size 14 impacts the ground with more force than a person with a size 8 even if they are an ideal body weight?

This is just poor engineering.  If I had my own shoe company I would change that but until then you can use the tips here to do what you can to avoid illness and injury from standing on your feet too long.

Tip Three:

– Release your feet and legs when you get home with the spring release techniques I give you below in tutorial 77 – 89:

Video Tutorial #77 How to Self Adjust Your Toes   
Video Tutorial #78 Deep Tissue Treatment Of The Knee Popliteus Muscle
Video Tutorial #79 Deep Tissue Treatment Of The Gluteus Medius Muscle of the Hip
Video Tutorial #80 Deep Tissue Treatment Of The Subtalar Joint Of The Ankle On The Inside
Video Tutorial #81 Deep Tissue Treatment Of The Ankle (Subtalar Joint Outside) 
Video Tutorial #82 Deep Tissue Treatment Under The Big Toe And Second Toe
Video Tutorial #83 Deep Tissue Treatment Above The Big Toe And Second Toe 
Video Tutorial #84 Scissor Stretching Of The Feet
Video Tutorial #85 Great For Mortons Neuromas And Narrow Heels
Video Tutorial #86 Dr James Stoxen DC Recommends The Best Shoes To Prevent The Foot From Deforming
Video Tutorial #87 Deep Tissue Of The Ankle Mortise
Video Tutorial #88 Stretching Of The Foot While Sitting At Your Chair
Video Tutorial #89 A Stretch To Increase The Flexibility Of The Arch Of Your Foot

Tip Four:

– Walk, Jog or Run Barefoot in zig zag, circle and figure eight directions to release the human spring and strengthen it in a balanced range of motion

Watch this video to see two time Taekwondo National Champion Christian Medina and Dr. Stoxen run barefoot in zig zag patterns.

I also suggest you read Anthony Field’s book, How I My Wiggle Back.  He is an entertainer who followed my approach and it helped him change his life. The book has over 200 tips for you in the 100 pages of content that are on the Human Spring Approach.


 

Disclaimer

Dr. James Stoxen DC Lectures At The Barefoot Running Festival Symposium, April 14, 2012 Boston MA

    Dr. James Stoxen DC Speaks At The Barefoot Running Festival Symposium April 14 1-4pm Boston Public Library Rabb Lecture Hall 700 Boylston Street Boston, MA 02216 The Barefoot Running Symposium is presented by the New England Barefoot Runners. This symposium is available to the general public at no charge on a first come, […]

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Dr. James Stoxen DC Speaks At The Barefoot Running Festival Symposium

April 14 1-4pm
Boston Public Library
Rabb Lecture Hall
700 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02216

The Barefoot Running Symposium is presented by the New England Barefoot Runners. This symposium is available to the general public at no charge on a first come, first serve basis.

This FREE event occurs during (and is part of) the 1st Annual Boston Barefoot Running Festival. This event showcases well known international speakers who have been studying running biomechanics for years. It includes pioneers of the barefoot running movement who have written books, who have previously shared their experiences through speaking engagements and barefoot running workshops.

Some of the other speakers at the symposium are:

Ken Bob Saxton
Huntington Beach, CA
World Famous Barefoot Running GURU
The Pioneer of the Barefoot Running Movement

 

Irene Davis, PhD, PT, FAPTA, FACSM, FASB
Boston, MA
Internationally Renowned Running Biomechanist
Director, Spaulding National Running Center
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School Spaulding-Cambridge Outpatient Center

Dr. Daniel Howell
Lynchburg, VA
The Barefoot Professor
Dr. Howell is an Associate Professor of Biology at Liberty University where he teaches human anatomy & physiology. Prior to joining the         faculty at Liberty, Daniel performed biomedical research at Duke University Medical Center and McGill University in Montreal. He obtained his Ph.D. in biochemistry from Virginia Tech in 1998.

Michael Sandler
Kula, Hawaii
Michael Sandler, former speed skater and professional level cyclist, suffered multiple injuries over the course of a lifetime, the last of which occurred just over 3 years ago. Weeks before a planned inline skating world record attempt across the country (LA to NYC) to raise awareness around ADD/ADHD, Michael experienced a life altering accident. Fortunately, Michael doesn’t believe in limitations. He’ll be the first to tell you he doesn’t believe in the word, “Can’t”. Slowly but surely, through a combination of determination, meditation, trust in the universe and the power of nature, Michael became a walking miracle.

Theresa Withee
Camden, ME
Early American Female Barefoot Running Pioneer and first woman to run the Boston Marathon Completely Barefoot in 2011 (All 26.2 Miles)

 

About the Festival

The 1st annual Boston Barefoot Running Festival and Barefoot 5K will take place on Saturday, April 14th and Sunday April 15, at the DCR’s Artesani Park in Boston.

This is a premier event NEVER BEFORE OFFERED in this area!!

Make HISTORY. Be part of the first Barefoot Race in Massachusetts!!

Sponsored by the New England Barefoot Runners, our aim is to bring together top barefoot runners, legends, and authors as well as internationally known doctors in the sporting industry, who will speak at the Barefoot Running Symposium (free!) in the Back Bay on Saturday. We will also conduct workshops and fun runs on Saturday and Sunday.

So join us!

Meet fellow barefoot runners through the two-day event, which includes a Festival Social on Saturday night and a professionally timed Barefoot 5K race along the Charles River on Sunday afternoon.

The cost for this two-day event is $50 by March 15th and $60 on and after March 16th. The cost for just the Barefoot 5K is $25 by March 15th and $30 after that date.

For more information and to register visit the barefoot running festival website.

 

 

MEDIA ALERT: The Loneliness Of The Long-Distance Wiggle Discusses His New Book, How I Got My Wiggle Back

    The Loneliness Of The Long-Distance Wiggle By David Free The Australian Newspaper  March 24, 2012 Is there a job in the world that isn’t considerably less fun than it looks? Being a Wiggle, you might suppose, would be a breeze. Roll out of bed at about 10, slip on the coloured shirt for […]

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Musician ,Anthony Field from children's group The Wiggles. Picture: Angelo Soulas Source: News Limited

 

The Loneliness Of The Long-Distance Wiggle
By David Free
The Australian Newspaper 
March 24, 2012

Is there a job in the world that isn’t considerably less fun than it looks? Being a Wiggle, you might suppose, would be a breeze.

Roll out of bed at about 10, slip on the coloured shirt for a midday show, mingle backstage with some sexy celebrity mums, then spend the remainder of the day reclining in a hot tub full of cash.

Anthony Field, the Blue Wiggle, has written a book that unveils the less glamorous reality: the bad hotels, the terrible food, the backstage arguments — one of them culminating in the throwing of a toy drum kit — the grim logistics of coping with irritable bowel syndrome on the road. Field isn’t complaining, mind you: he keeps stressing that the joy of the live shows makes it all worthwhile. But he leaves you feeling that he and his fellow Wiggles have thoroughly earned their success.

Field earned his while suffering from a diabolical array of health problems that threatened, at one stage, to curtail his wiggling for good. He pulled himself back from the brink thanks to an exercise and dietary regime he details in the book’s second half. But it’s the first half, describing how he got to the brink in the first place, that makes for more compelling reading.

Field played in Sydney band the Cockroaches as a youngster. An uncomfortable fit as a rock ‘n’ roller, he quit to finish a degree in early childhood education. This proved to be a shrewd career move. During his final year at university, he formed a children’s group with two other teaching students, Murray Cook and Greg Page, and ex-Cockroach Jeff Fatt. The Wiggles were born. (A fifth Wiggle, Phillip Wilcher, played on their first album but left soon afterwards.)

The group’s early struggles were not all that different from an emerging rock band’s: there were meetings with boneheaded executives, efforts to crack the US market, gruelling tour schedules. Sometimes they played three 90-minute shows a day. Could Keith Richards manage that?

Probably not, if he had to spend two hours in the backstage toilet every time he ingested something mildly toxic.

Field, during his darkest years, was so unhealthy that he made Keef look like Michael Phelps. His problems, according to his incomplete list, included “hernias, back ailments, broken bones, food sensitivities, colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, potentially fatal infections, circulation issues, and exhaustion”.

We need a few words of clarification here about the Wiggles’ health issues. Field is not the Wiggle who left the group to deal with a mysterious fainting illness. That was the Yellow Wiggle, Page, who quit in 2006, and was reinstated earlier this year, causing his replacement, Sam Moran, to be controversially stripped of the yellow shirt. (Field’s book, alas, was completed too early to tackle the Wigglegate imbroglio.)

Nor is Field to be confused with the Purple Wiggle, Fatt, who had a pacemaker installed last year. No, Field is the one who has suffered from just about everything else. He is excellent at evoking what it’s like to live with chronic pain. Fellow sufferers will find some of his observations scarily accurate. “Pain,” he says, “becomes a habit that’s hard to break.”

Field broke it when he met a holistic chiropractor named James Stoxen. In the book’s second half Field lays out, complete with photographs, the exercise routines with which Stoxen helped him morph from an overweight, pain-racked pill-popper into the chiselled, tattooed specimen depicted on the book’s front cover. (Sidebar question: now that even the Wiggles are getting tattoos, can we agree that the tattoo has officially lost its bad-boy connotations? Who’s getting one next? Kevin Rudd?)

How I Got My Wiggle Back

The book, it must be said, does get bogged down exploring the Stoxen philosophy. Stoxen views the body as a giant spring. He carries around a bedspring in his bag to demonstrate this principle. He believes that the spring is divided into seven floors or levels. He abhors shoes and advocates walking around barefooted whenever possible. He may be right about these things. But his intonations do sound, prima facie, like those of many other self-help gurus who have gone before him.

Still, his techniques have worked for Field. Nor can you question the genuineness of Field’s desire to spread the word. He knows he sounds like an evangelist but feels the good news must be shared. His fervour is contagious. At one point I seriously considered rustling up a set of witch’s hats (where do you buy a witch’s hat?) and giving his program a try. I know how his young fans feel. Field has enthusiasm, and that can’t be faked. Somehow he never lost it, no matter how debilitating his problems.

MEDIA ALERT: People Magazine This Week Features Wiggles and How I Got My Wiggle Back

  MEDIA ALERT: People Magazine This Week Features Wiggles and How I Got My Wiggle Back which Features Dr. James Stoxen’s Approach That Helped Anthony Field Here it is:   Be Sure to get your copy 

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MEDIA ALERT: People Magazine This Week Features Wiggles and How I Got My Wiggle Back which Features Dr. James Stoxen’s Approach That Helped Anthony Field

Here it is:   Be Sure to get your copy 

Dr. James Stoxen DC, Invited To Lecture At The 2012, 9th Malaysian Conference And Exhibition On Anti-Aging, Aesthetic And Regenerative Medicine And The 2nd International Conference On Anti-Aging, Aesthetic And Regenerative Medicine

Depression ICD-9 296.3 Dr James Stoxen DC, Invited To Lecture At: The 9th Malaysian Conference and Exhibition on Anti-Aging, Aesthetic and Regenerative Medicine and 2nd International Congress on Anti-Aging, Aesthetic and Regenerative Medicine Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia April 27 – 29, 2012 Conference Official Web Site Dr Stoxen’s topic is: The Depression Inflammation Connection and Aging Speakers […]

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Depression ICD-9 296.3

Dr James Stoxen DC, Invited To Lecture At:

The 9th Malaysian Conference and Exhibition on Anti-Aging, Aesthetic and Regenerative Medicine and
2nd International Congress on Anti-Aging, Aesthetic and Regenerative Medicine
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
April 27 – 29, 2012

Conference Official Web Site

Dr Stoxen’s topic is:
The Depression Inflammation Connection and Aging

Speakers included in the conference are:

.

DR ROBERT GOLDMAN, M.D., Ph,D., D.O., FAASP
Chairman American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine (A4M)

DR RON ROTHENBERG MD, FACEP
Former Clinical Professor, Preventive & Family Medicine, UCSD School of Medicine; Board Certified and Fellow,
American Board of Anti-Aging and Regenerative Medicine; Board Certified, American Board of Emergency Medicine;
Founder, California HealthSpan Institute

DR AL SEARS MD
Founder / Medical Director
Wellness Research Foundation, and Dr. Sears’ Centre for Health & Wellness, Royal Palm Beach, FL

DR MARIA CLAUDIA ALMEIDA ISSA MD, PhD
Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

DR JAMES LEE JOHN BILZON
BSc, MSc, PhD, FSSEMM
Head of Department,
Department for Health,
University of Bath, Bath UK

PROF DR VLADIMIR KRCMERY
MD, PhD,
Nobel Peace Price Nominee
Founder, President – St Elizabeth Un ive rsity,
Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology
Professor and Dean, School of Public Health ,
University of Trnava, Slovac Republic

DR SHIGEO HORIE, M.D.
Professor and the Chair
Dept of Urology
Teikyo Univerrsity
School of Medicine

DR YOSHIKAZU YONEI, M.D.,Ph.,D.
Professor Anti-Aging Medica  Research Center,
Graduate School of Life and Medical Sciences,
Doshisha University

Topics Included are:

● Genomics and Biology in Human Aging
● The First Step toward Resetting the Genetic Clock
● Neuro Endocrinology
● Anti-Aging Principles in Stroke/Trauma Rehabilitation
● Immune System Deficiency / Adrenal Fatigue
● Cognition Memory Decline
● Endocrinology of Aging
● Hormone Balance and Restoration Therapies
● Cognitive Memory Decline and Pregnolone
● Cortisol: Stress and Adrenal Fatigue
● Adrenal Insufficiency and Treatment : DHEA
● Thyroid Optimization
● Prescribing Treatment for Hormonal Replacement including
Compounded Thyroid Medications
● Estrogen and Progesterone: Sex, Menopause and QOL
● Testosterone: Sex, Andropause and QOL
● DHEA: Immune System and Well Being
● Adult Growth Hormone, Obesity and Regeneration
● Vitamin D and Melatonin
● Fundamentals and Clinical Applications of I/V Protocols in
Regenerative Medicine
● Understanding the importance of the GI Tract’s Role in the
immune System
● Know the consequences of Trans-fatty Acid Intake
● Obesity and Cardio Metabolic Syndrome
● Non-invasive Assessment of Coronary Artery Disease
● Cardiovascular Disease: Detection and Prevention
● Hormones and the Heart
● Laboratory Protocols on Anti-Aging Medline
● Exercise and its Role in QOL
● Stress, Exercise and Impact on Hormones
● Antioxidant Therapies and Supplementation – Can it Slow
the Aging Process
● Role of Nutrition in Maintaining Optimal Health as we Age.
● Fundamentals of Healing through Exercise
● Environmental Medicine, Toxins and Heavy Metal
● Role of Physical, Psychological and Spiritual Health in
Anti-Aging
● Changes in Oral Mucosa in the Elderly and its Management
● Periodontal Infections and Its Effect on Systemic Diseases of
Aging and Longevity

Regenerative and Cell Based Medicine

● Basic Stem Cell Science
● Clinical Application of Stem Cells – Orthopaedic, Cardiac
and Neurological
● How to Begin Treating your Patients with Stem Cells?
● Epidermal Regeneration
● Metabolic and Cellular Detoxification
● Stem Cell Therapy in Anti-Aging Medicine
● External Counter Pulsation (ECP) Therapy for Coronary Heart
Diseases and Other Circulatory Disease
● I V Protocols in Regenerative Medicine

Aesthetic Medicine

● Introduction to Basics of Aging Skin and Aesthetic Procedures
● Pharmacology and Cosmeticeuticals
● Peeling Skin and Rejuvenation
● Facial Sculpting with Botox and Dermal Fitters
● Non-surgical Alternatives for Facial Rejuvenation
● Industry News – Technology Update
● PRP Techniques
● Adipose Derived Stem Cell Therapies
● Fat Autologus Muscular Injection
● Non Invasive Face Lifting Techniques
● Non Ablative Lasers for a Youthful Skin
● Hair Solutions
● Non invasive Reshaping and Contouring Body Techniques
● Non ablative Lasers for a Youthful Skin
● The Aging Neck Rejuvenation

Target audience at the conference will include medical, professionals from the following therapeutic areas:

  • general practitioners
  • bariatrican /weight management specialists
  • cardiologists
  • endocrinologists
  • internal medical specialists
  • obstetrics and gynaecologists
  • geriatricians
  • rehabilitation therapists
  • researchers and scientists
  • dentists
  • sports physicians
  • Anti-Aging Certified Physicians
  • doctors practicing aesthetic medicine
  • nutritionists
  • dieticians
  • academic/educational specialists from
  • Malaysia and around the Asean region.

 

Dr. James Stoxen DC, Invited To Lecture At The 2012, 4th American Academy In Anti-Aging And Regenerative Medicine And 2nd Congress On Anti-aging Medicine, Bangkok Thailand

Depression ICD-9 296.3 Dr. James Stoxen DC, Will Present At The 2012, 4th American Academy In Anti-Aging And Regenerative Medicine and 2nd Congress On Anti-aging and Aesthetic Medicine September 7-9, 2012 Bangkok, Thailand at the Bangkok Convention Centre Dr Stoxen’s topic is: The Depression Inflammation Connection and Aging A4M US has declared their previous conference held […]

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Depression ICD-9 296.3

.

.

Dr. James Stoxen DC, Will Present At The 2012, 4th American Academy In Anti-Aging And Regenerative Medicine and 2nd Congress On Anti-aging and Aesthetic Medicine
September 7-9, 2012
Bangkok, Thailand at the Bangkok Convention Centre

Dr Stoxen’s topic is:
The Depression Inflammation Connection and Aging

A4M US has declared their previous conference held last September 2-4, 2011 as the biggest anti-aging conference in Asia with over 80 participating companies and total number of 1,200 delegates including 70 speakers from all over the globe. They are also proud to announce another year of partnership with the Thailand Cosmetic Dermatology and Surgery (Thaicosderm).

Speakers Included:

Ahmed Al-Qahtani – USA

Amaranila Lalita Drijono – Indonesia

Atchima Suwanchinda – Thailand

Azard Rastegar – USA

Christoph Ganss – Germany

Cristina Puyat – Philippines

David Quig – USA

David Wong – USA

Gan Siok Ngoh  – Singapore

Garth Fortune – USA

Gino Turera – USA

Gregory Burzinski – USA

Hans Kugler – USA

James Stoxen – USA

Jame Darakjan – USA

Janejira Chaicalotornkul – Thailand

Jim Bell – USA

Jinda Rojanamatin – Thailand

Joan Vandeputte – Germany

Kwon Han Jin – Korea

Lee Young Seob – Korea

Marina Lobova – Russia

Mark Gordon – USA

Mayer Einstein – USA

Michael Klentz – Thailand

Mulyadi Tedjapranata – Indonesia

Naina Sachdev – USA

Nalinee Sutthipisal – Thailand

Niwat Polnikorn – Thailand

Paisal Rummanteethorn – Thailand

Pakpilai Thavisin – Thailand

Park Byun-Soon – Korea

Peter Huang – Taiwan

Raymond Lacroix – USA

Richard DeAndrea – USA

Salvador Gonzalez – Spain

Sandy Schwartz – USA

Sanjay Kapur – USA

Somnuk Siripanthong – Thailand

Stephen Holt – USA

Steven Dayan – USA

Sunita Banjerji – India

Tanom Bunaprasert – Thailand

Tanomkit Pawcsuntorn – Thailand

Thada Piamphongsant – Thailand

Todd Ovokitys – USA

Ulrich Friedrichson – Germany

Ursula Jacob – Germany

Viboon Rojanvanich – Thailand

Wahl Greger – Germany

Warren Matthews – New Zealand

Weimin Liu – USA

Wichai Hongcharu – Thailand

Wilai Thanasarnaksorn – Thailand

Yeung Chi Keung – Hong Kong

The American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine (A4M) is a US federally registered 501(c) 3 non-profit organization comprised of 22,000-plus member physicians, health practitioners, scientists, governmental officials, and members of the general public, representing over 105 nations.
The A4M is dedicated to the advancement of technology to detect, prevent, and treat aging related disease and to promote research into methods to retard and optimize the human aging process. The A4M is also dedicated to educating physicians, scientists, and members of the public on biomedical sciences, breaking technologies, and anti-aging issues.

The A4M believes that the disabilities associated with normal aging are caused by physiological dysfunction which in many cases are ameliorable to medical treatment, such that the human lifespan can be increased, and the quality of one’s life enhanced as one grows chronologically older.
The A4M seeks to disseminate information concerning innovative science and research as well as treatment modalities designed to prolong the human lifespan. Anti-Aging Medicine is based on the scientific principles of responsible medical care consistent with those of other healthcare specialties. Although the A4M seeks to disseminate information on many types of medical treatments, it does not promote or endorse any specific treatment nor does it sell or endorse any commercial product.

The A4M is comprised of 22,000-plus members from 105 nations worldwide, as follows:

• 85% of our membership are physicians (MD, DO, MBBS)
• 12% are scientists, researchers, and health practitioners; and
• 3% are governmental officials, members of the working press and general public
The disciplines of our physician members are roughly as follows:
• Family Practice, 23%
• General Medicine, 15%
• Endocrinology, 11%
• Internal Medicine, 8%
• Dermatology, 8%
• Plastic Surgery, 6%
• Cardiology, 8%
• Doctors of Osteopathy (D.O.), 6%
• OB-GYN, 5%
• Sports Medicine, 4%
• Orthopedics, 2%
• Emergency Medicine, 2%

The 4th Bangkok International Congress on Anti-Aging and Regenerative Medicine (BCAARM 2012)
Advisory Panel:

Dr. Bill Anton
Chairman, Australasian Academy of Anti-Aging & Aesthetic Medicine (A5M)

Dr. Piti Palungwachira
Dean of School of Anti-Aging, Mae Fah Luang University, Bangkok, Thailand

Dr. Preecha Tiewtranon
Founder of Preecha Aesthetic Institute(PAI), Bangkok, Thailand

Dr. Robert Goldman
Chairman of the Board, The American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine (A4M)
Chairman, The World Anti-Aging Academy of Medicine (WAAAM)

Dr. Stephen Holt
Board Member, European Society of Preventive,
Regenerative & Anti-Aging Medicine (ESAAM)

Prof. Dr. Surasak Taneepanichskul
Dean of College of Public Health Sciences
Chulalongkorn University Bangkok, Thailand

Steering Committee:

Prof. Dr. Michael Klentze
General Secretary, European Society of Preventive Regenerative and Anti-Aging Medicine (ESAAM)

Prof. Karl Neeser
Chulanlongkorn University Bangkok, Thailand

Dr. Jakkriss Poomsawat
President of The Foundation for Development of Complementary Alternative Medicine

Pol. Col. Vipasri Pipatphum
(M.Sc.in Pharm) Mahidol, Chula R&D Adivisory Board (Research)

Dr. Ali Mohamed
International Medical Advisor, Villa Medica Germany

Dr. Tewan Thaneerat
Director of Bureau of Alternative Medicine, Thailand

Dr. Somboon Roongphornchai
Medical Doctor at Vitallife Corporation, Thailand

Dr. Pimjai Naigowit
Department of Medical Science, Ministry of Public Health, Thailand

Dr. Panoowat Poompruek
Medical Doctor at TRIA, Thailand

Dr. Somnuk Siripanthong
Senior Medical Advisor at Puritec Biomedical Engineering, Thailand

Dr. Sompoch Nipakanont
CEO of Bangkok Mediplex, Thailand

Scientific Committee:

Dr. Ali Mohamed
International Medical Advisor, Villa Medica Germany

Prof. Karl Neeser
Chulanlongkorn University Bangkok, Thailand

Prof. Dr. Michael Klentze
General Secretary, European Society of Preventive Regenerative and Anti-Aging Medicine (ESAAM)

Dr. Somnuk Siripanthong
Senior Medical Advisor at Puritec Biomedical Engineering, Thailand

Pol. Col. Vipasri Pipatphum
(M.Sc.in Pharm) Mahidol, Chula R&D Adivisory Board (Research)

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