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Listen To Dr. Stoxen’s Interview On Afternoons With Richard Stubbs 774 ABC Radio Melbourne, Australia

  Listen to the Podcast below: Dr. James Stoxen DC Radio Interview  On Afternoons With Richard Stubbs 774 ABC Radio, Melbourne Dr James Stoxen is visiting Australia to lecture about The Inflammation-Depression Connection as well as Run For Life! Barefoot Or Shod?   at The 6th Annual A5M Conference in Anti-Aging and Aesthetic Medicine in Melbourne, Australia […]

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Listen to the Podcast below:

Dr. James Stoxen DC Radio Interview 
On Afternoons With Richard Stubbs
774 ABC Radio, Melbourne

Dr James Stoxen is visiting Australia to lecture about The Inflammation-Depression Connection as well as Run For Life! Barefoot Or Shod?   at The 6th Annual A5M Conference in Anti-Aging and Aesthetic Medicine in Melbourne, Australia which takes place Sunday August 19th.

He speaks to Richard Stubbs about barefoot running and the human spring. Both of these concepts are explained further in Anthony Field’s (the blue wiggle) memoir of healing book, How I got my Wiggle Back. for more information on  how to get the book, click here

Listen to Dr. Stoxen on More Radio Interviews below:

Listen To Dr. James Stoxen DC Interview with Bernadette Young ABC Gold Coast Radio 91.7 Sydney Australia

Listen To Dr. Stoxen’s Interview On Luke Grant Afternoons show 873 AM 2GB Radio, Sydney, Australia

Dr. James Stoxen DC Lecture and Media Schedule for Australia 2012

Chiropractic is about to get a boost in Australia this week! Here is the media schedule for the week Monday August 13th: 11:00am Australian Men’s Living Magazine mensliving.com 1:30pm Wellness Magazine (video interview) soulsessions.com Tuesday August 14th:  10:00am  Watch Dr Stoxen on the Morning Show Channel 7 (TV)  MorningShow.com 3:00pm Five AA Radio fiveaa.com 3:30pm  Adelaide Advertiser Newspaper adelaidenow.com Wednesday August 15th: The […]

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Chiropractic is about to get a boost in Australia this week!

Here is the media schedule for the week

Monday August 13th:

Tuesday August 14th: 

Wednesday August 15th:

Thursday August 16th:

  • 10:00am Interview with the Herald Sun Newspaper to be released later in the week  heraldsun.com
  • 1:00pm Interview with Richard Stubbs ABC 774 Radio

Friday August 17th:

  • 10:10am ABC  105.7 Darwin Interview with Kate O’ Toole abc.net.au.darwin
  • 2:00pm  ABC Gold Coast Radio 91.7 Interview with Bernadette Young  abc.net.au
  • 3:00pm 4BC Brisbane Radio am 1116 Interview with John Scott  www.4bc.com.au

Sunday August 19th:

  • 10:30am Presentation:  Inflammation Depression  A5M.net
  • Watch ABC 24 (TV) at 10:30am Dr Stoxens interview on the Breakfast Show www.abc.24.au.co
  • 5:30pm Presentation:  Run For Life!  A5M.net

Dr. Stoxen will  be lecturing at The 6th Annual A5M Conference in Anti-Aging and Aesthetic Medicine in Melbourne, Australia which takes place Sunday August 18th and 19th.

We urge you to attend the conference in Melbourne, visit the exhibit hall and meet Dr. Stoxen.

For more information about conference, click here 

Dr Stoxens lectures will be:
The Inflammation-Depression Connection Sunday 08/19/12  10:30am
Run For Life! Barefoot Or Shod? Sunday 08/19/12 5:30pm

Feel Free To Register for our updates below:

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Disclaimer

All content on teamdoctorsblog.com, including without limitation text, graphics, images, advertisements, videos, and links (“Content”) are for informational purposes only. The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical treatment, advice, or diagnosis. Please remember to always seek the advice of a qualified physician or health professional with any questions you may have regarding any medical concerns. Dr James Stoxen DC and Team Doctors does not recommend or endorse any specific treatments, physicians, products, opinions, research, tests, or other information it mentions. Said Content is also not intended to be a substitute for professional legal or financial advice. Reliance on any information provided by Team Doctors is solely at your own risk.

 

Media Alert!!! CNN Shanon Cook Interviews Anthony Field and Dr. James Stoxen DC

Depression ICD-9 296.3 Media Alert!! CNN Shanon Cook Interviews Anthony Field and Dr. James Stoxen DC The Wiggles 1991 self-titled album launched a performing career that has lasted more than two decades. The Wiggles have performed more than 350 shows to more than 1.5 million fans since 2005 in the United States alone. But after […]

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Depression ICD-9 296.3

Media Alert!! CNN Shanon Cook Interviews Anthony Field and Dr. James Stoxen DC

The Wiggles 1991 self-titled album launched a performing career that has lasted more than two decades. The Wiggles have performed more than 350 shows to more than 1.5 million fans since 2005 in the United States alone. But after 21 years and 39 videos/DVDs  three of the four original Wiggles, Greg Page, Murray Cook and Jeff Fatt, are hanging up their skivvies after they wrap up the Celebration Tour.

Only Blue Wiggle, Anthony Field will continue to perform with Emma Watkins, Lachlan Gillespie, and Simon Pryce, who have been handpicked by the group to become the Yellow, Purple, and Red Wiggle.

Anthony Field, also known as the “Blue Wiggle” of the most popular and successful children’s performing act out of Australia, “The Wiggles,” was smiling in front of the cameras and the crowds, but grimacing in pain backstage.

Resiliency is something Field has come to know well. In spite of the huge success of the group it hasn’t always been ‘lollipops and rainbows’.

Anthony Field shares on CNN

Anthony shares about how he had clinical depression and a variety of ailments such as a herniated disc, joint pain, migraines, digestive problems,  life-threatening illness and chronic pain.

After decades of failed treatments, he managed to turn his health around.

Anthony Field shares, “It all started with Dr. James Stoxen a chiropractor”

Dr. James Stoxen DC, popular with touring celebrities, his main advice for getting Field back on track didn’t exactly sound like ‘star treatment‘.

Dr. James Stoxen DC, CNN Interview

Dr. Stoxen shares, “When we decided to go barefoot, Anthony looked at me strange. When we wear footwear it becomes a binding device and it inhibits the natural motion of the human foot”.

By ditching his shoes as much as possible and committing to Dr. Stoxen’s lengthy treatment sessions, Dr. Stoxen calls, ‘the pain exorcism’ and revamping his diet, Field says that he is free of the pain that almost caused him to quit the Wiggles in 2004.

“I am in the best physical shape I have ever been in and i’m almost 50 now”  Anthony Field

The wiggles are on their Celebration Tour now throughout the summer.  This is the last tour with the four original Wiggles so don’t miss it!

Anthony Field shares about his inspiring, behind-the-scenes store of how he overcame chronic pain, depression and more with the help of Dr. James Stoxen DC and Dr. Richard Gringeri Dc in a healing memoir book written by Anthony Field and Greg Truman entitled, How I Got My Wiggle Back.

To order How I Got My Wiggle Back on Amazon.com, click here

Be sure to tune in live on CNN this Saturday August 4th!

Update:

CNN Anthony Field interview makes front page

The CNN Interview made page one on CNN.com!, to view, click here

 

 

 

Doc Gringeri and Dr. Stoxen Visit The Wiggles Show!

  Doc Gringeri and Dr. Stoxen Visit the Wiggles Show!                                            

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Doc Gringeri and Dr. Stoxen Visit the Wiggles Show!

Dr. James Stoxen DC, Dr. Richard Gringeri DD, Rodney Squires and Anthony Field

 

Dr. Richard Gringeri, Anthony Field and Dr. James Stoxen DC

 

Dr. Richard Gringeri and Dr. James Stoxen DC

 

Dr. Richard Gringeri DC, Dr. James Stoxen DC and Greg Page

 

Dr. James Stoxen DC, Anthony Field and Dr. Richard Gringeri DC

 

Dr Rich Gringeri DC (left) and Dr. James Stoxen DC (right)

 

Greg Page and Dr. James Stoxen DC

 

Dr. Richard Gringeri DC, Greg Page and Dr. James Stoxen DC

 

Dr. Richard Gringeri DC, Dr. James Stoxen DC, and Rodney Squires

 

Dr. James Stoxen DC

 

Dr. Gringeri, Dr. Stoxen and Rodney Squires Backstage at the Wiggles Concert

 

Dr. Gringeri and Dr. Stoxen Backstage at the Wiggles Concert

 

Anthony Field, Dr. Gringeri, Dr. Stoxen and Rodney Squires

 

Dr. Stoxen and Dr. Gringeri backstage at the Wiggles Concert

 

Dr. Stoxen, Dr. Gringeri and Anthony Field backstage

 

Dr. Stoxen, Anthony Field and Dr. Gringeri

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Video Testimonial – Dr. James Stoxen DC – National College of Chiropractic Grad 1986

  This is a video testimonial I am proud to have done about National University Health Sciences, formerly National College of Chiropractic.   My father Dr Paul Stoxen DC graduated there in 1949 and I graduated there in 1986. They really did a great job in preparing me for my career as a chiropractor. I […]

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This is a video testimonial I am proud to have done about National University Health Sciences, formerly National College of Chiropractic.

 

My father Dr Paul Stoxen DC graduated there in 1949 and I graduated there in 1986. They really did a great job in preparing me for my career as a chiropractor. I highly recommend NCC!

Meet Dr. James Stoxen DC, who graduated from National in 1986:

I choose National because it offered the chiropractic component and more importantly for me, I wanted to lecture and be involved in the medical component. I liked the more medical oriented method rather than the straight method because I felt that I could communicate better with the medical profession on their level and you know what? It was a good idea.

Why did James Stoxen choose a career in chiropractic medicine?

My mother sat me down one day when I was 17 years old. She had a piece of paper in her hand and I said, “Oh No, here we go”. She said, “Now what we are going to do is write out all the things you love to do and what you see yourself doing in the future.

I wrote things down such as:

  1. I like to go to rock concerts
  2. I like to work on Athletes
  3. I like sports
  4. I like training
  5. I like to go to sporting events
  6. I like to travel around the world
  7. I want to meet interesting people and be around successful people
  8. I like to help others

She took the pencil and circled all of those things and said, “If you could find a career that will allow you to do all of those things then you will never work a day in your life and that is exactly how I feel.

I have the greatest job ever!!!!!!!

Today, Dr. Stoxen has treated national and world champion athletes and has treated celebrities at concerts and tours around the world. read more

I have been back stage as an entertainer doctor working 12-15 hours a day with some of the icons that I idolized as a kid. As well as the new and up and coming recording artist that you hear on the radio. Half of them I have worked for.

Dr. Stoxen has lectured at medical conferences around the world about his approach to patient care. read more

I found that the body is a natural spring that recycles energy with each impact so that means we can run long distances and we can go all day without getting tired. The spring protects us from these impacts and the landings in sports as well as in running and walking.

I found that was the secret. I incorporated the physics and engineering. I put this together with treatment.

This whole Human Spring Approach came because of my knowledge.

The College professors at ‘National University’, taught me how to research, go to the library for research study. They taught me to investigate what research studies were making sense and what not making sense.

Based on what I learned at ‘National University’, I was able to go through thousands of research papers and prepare excellent presentations using the studies and findings that were here already.

I used the Human Spring Approach to treat a very famous celebrity, Anthony Field, from the “Wiggles’.

In 15 hours over the course of a weekend I was able to move the restriction on his Human Spring. We were able to reverse 25 years of chronic pain that he could not find the answers to help him.

Dr. James Stoxen DC

He decided to write a book about it, ‘How I Got My Wiggle Back’ by Anthony Field and Greg Truman. In this book he tells the whole story how he formed the Wiggles and how he suffered for those 25 years barely getting through the tours. He also shares how he was in agony and depression. The inflammation from his dietary problems and musculoskeletal problems made the depression worse. He was on medication for many years. Dr. Richard Gringeri and I helped him get off the medication and get on to a better, healthy life.

What’s Dr. Stoxen’s advice to those considering a career in chiropractic medicine?

You really need to find your dream job! So that every day you go to work, it’s not work.

Get our your piece of paper and make out that list then circle it. See if chiropractic fits and if it does then choose it.

for more information on National University of Health and Sciences click here
or call 1-800-826-6285

 

 

Wiggles Pickles n’ Foot Tickles By Jaya J: Spring Of Youth

    Wiggles Pickles n’ Foot Tickles by Jaya J: Spring Of Youth May 24, 2012 click here to view post on Jaya J’s blog site This is the first blog post from the writer who is preparing the feature story for the Malasia Star, the largest English paper in Malaysia. I think she’s got it […]

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Wiggles Pickles n’ Foot Tickles by Jaya J: Spring Of Youth
May 24, 2012

click here to view post on Jaya J’s blog site

This is the first blog post from the writer who is preparing the feature story for the Malasia Star, the largest English paper in Malaysia.

I think she’s got it and can put a comical entertaining spin on it as well well for all the Wiggle fans in Malaysia.

This should add some color to the blue, red, yellow and red Wiggles and the Human Spring.

I love it!

 

Stay tuned for more wiggles pickles and foot tickles.

Video Tutorial # 195 “Getting Fit At The Playground” Series: The Hanging Abdominal Raise With Pike Demonstrated By Dr. John Petrozzi DC, Spotted By Dr. James Stoxen DC

  Dr. James Stoxen DC of Chicago IL and Dr. John Petrozzi Dc of Leichhardt NSW Australia April 29, 2012 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Challenge your abdominal muscles with a hanging abdominal raise with pike exercise  In this video tutorial I introduce to you Dr. John Petrozzi DC who is also the principal of Petrozzi Wellness Centre […]

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Dr. James Stoxen DC of Chicago IL and
Dr. John Petrozzi Dc of Leichhardt NSW Australia
April 29, 2012
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Dr. John Petrozzi DC

Challenge your abdominal muscles with a hanging abdominal raise with pike exercise 

In this video tutorial I introduce to you Dr. John Petrozzi DC who is also the principal of Petrozzi Wellness Centre which is located in Leichardt, Australia.  Dr. Petrozzi also assists the children’s entertainment group ‘The Wiggles’ and other people with high public profiles. To learn more about Dr. John Petrozzi DC and Petrozzi Wellness Centre,  click here.

Today we are going to demonstrate a hanging abdominal raise with pike routine. This is one of Anthony Fields, frontman for the ‘Wiggles‘, famous routines that he did to get himself into super fit shape.

You can read about it in his book, ‘How I Got My Wiggle Back’ which you can pick up in Australia, US, UK and Canada. You can also order it from the Amazon site by clicking here.

Dr. James Stoxen DC Trains Anthony Field Backstage

This is not an easy exercise for most people. It is more advanced. We will challenge Dr. Petrozzi (although he is a young guy in shape).

This exercise is one you can do just about anywhere there is a bar, rings or something to grab hold of above.

A park setting such as this one in the video is an excellent place.

You can even take your kids and do this exercise taking turns with them.

  1. Make sure you hold on with a good solid grip above to the rings.
  2. Relax your arms.
  3. Lift up with your legs to a pike position
  4. point your toes
  5. try to hold for 20 seconds

To challenge yourself even further you can add a lift from the mid section while lifting your legs into the pike position.

If necessary you might need someone to spot you underneath your legs.

Dr. James Stoxen DC and Dr. John Petrozzi DC

 

Be sure to breath in and out.

As you can see above in the video the hanging ab exercise can be challenging the further you get the legs out from the fulcrum, the more the force is at the abdominal area.

You can see the other ‘Getting Fit At The Playground Series’ posts by clicking on the links below:

Video Tutorial #196 ‘Getting Fit At The Playground Series’ The Hanging Abdominal Split, Demonstrated By Dr. John Petrozzi DC, Spotted By Dr. James Stoxen DC, click here

Video Tutorial #197 ‘Getting Fit At The Playground” Series, The Hanging Abdominal Raise With Lateral Flexion, Demonstrated By Dr. John Petrozzi DC, Spotted By Dr. James Stoxen DC, click here

Video Tutorial #198 ‘Getting Fit At The Playground Series’, Beginners Hanging Abdominal Stretch-Strengthening, Demonstrated By Dr. John Petrozzi DC, Spotted By Dr. James Stoxen DC, click here

Video Tutorial #199 Getting Fit At The Playground Series, Beginners Hanging Abdominal Swing,  Demonstrated By Dr. John Petrozzi DC, Spotted By  Dr. James Stoxen DC, click here

I urge you to get out and take your kids to the park and have some fun while at the same time challenging yourself with the hanging abdominal raise with pike exercise!

Disclaimer 

Video Tutorial #90 Obstacle Course, Combining Exercise Drills

Obstacle Course, Combining Exercise Drills This drill actually combines various exercise drills that move the body in different movement patterns such as: Side Shuffle Zig Zag Backward Cone Touches and Circle Runs excerpt taken from the book, ‘How I Got My Wiggle Back’, The drills concentrate on moving in multiple directions (side to side, zig-zagging, […]

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Obstacle Course, Combining Exercise Drills

This drill actually combines various exercise drills that move the body in different movement patterns such as:

Obstacle Course

  1. Side Shuffle
  2. Zig Zag
  3. Backward Cone Touches
  4. and Circle Runs

excerpt taken from the book, ‘How I Got My Wiggle Back’, The drills concentrate on moving in multiple directions (side to side, zig-zagging, circles) to challenge spring suspension system muscles that often become weak because we don’t vary our movement. We move in a straight line too much-on a flat footpath, a treadmill, or a Stairmaster- and by doing so only exercise the foot spring suspension muscles in the front and back, not on the side and elsewhere.

 

ARTICLE, NYCC SPINAL COLUMN: NYCC Chiropractor, Dr. Amir Majidi DC Embracing Human Spring Approach, How I Got My Wiggle Back and our 48 hour Trip to Malaysia

  Hi Friends This is a really great article in the New York Chiropractic College newsletter, The Spinal Column, about a young chiropractor, Dr Amir Majidi DC, who has embraced the Human Spring Theory, and has become one of my research assistants, then traveled 32 hours to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia to help me lecture in […]

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Hi Friends

This is a really great article in the New York Chiropractic College newsletter, The Spinal Column, about a young chiropractor, Dr Amir Majidi DC, who has embraced the Human Spring Theory, and has become one of my research assistants, then traveled 32 hours to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia to help me lecture in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, April 27 – 29, 2012.  click here

Enjoy the article, below!

New York Chiropractic College
May 2012 edition
Title: Depew Intern Embraces Human Spring Theory

click here for the original article

Dr. Amir Majidi DC

A 30-YEAR-OLD MAN OR woman goes FOR A walk or run around the block and then complains of knee or back pain; but then there’s the 70-yearold who runs 15 miles every day and is pain free. Why? A couple of years ago, ninth trimester Depew intern Amir Majidi began seeking answers to this riddle, which had puzzled him for years. Searches on the Internet satisfied his curiosity and led him to a research assistantship with Team Doctors, of Chicago, Ill., and a rewarding friendship with its pioneering owner, Dr. James Stoxen, DC.

Majidi, who possesses a voracious appetite for anything he can read about chiropractic, discovered blogs about Dr. Stoxen and soon became fascinated by his approach to chiropractic: the Human Spring Model of evaluation, treatment, training and maintaining the human body. Stoxen’s model, as described in his website, Why Do I Run Barefoot , views the body as
“a spring mechanism vs. a lever mechanism as it is currently viewed by the scientific community. This human spring model states the body is composed of muscles, ligaments, tendons that protect it and recycle energy for maximum efficiency through the elastic recoil mechanisms. This allows movement such as walking, running, and performance in sports to be safer and more efficient.” Stoxen explains, “Our bodies spring off the ground when the spring mechanism is intact. When the spring mechanism locks, it switches to the less protective and less efficient lever system, which causes our body’s mass to bang into the ground with less efficiency.”

Dr. Amir Majidi DC and Dr. James Stoxen DC

Stoxen feels there is a strong connection between this spring mechanism breakdown and the occurrence of chronic pain, chronic fatigue, and the diseases of aging related to chronic inflammation due mainly to “binding or restrictive devices on any region of the body, especially the foot and weakness in the spring suspension system muscles that function to spring the mass off the ground during impacts.” To combat this, he releases the tension and joint-play restriction from the spring, strengthens the spring suspension system muscles, and advises walking and running barefoot with specific drills and plyometric training. This theory hit home for Majidi, who learned to appreciate structure from his engineer father. Stoxen has taken him under his wing. “I want to learn and he helped me by phone, video conferencing, and through video tutorials and articles published in his blog.”

The Human Spring Model and approach has recently attracted much media attention, thanks in large part to one of its most grateful advocates: Anthony Field, creator and a founding member of The Wiggles – the world’s most successful musical group for young children. Field was handicapped by chronic pain, chronic fatigue, misdiagnosed fibromyalgia and depression during his 20 years on the road. In 2004 he had decided to walk away from The Wiggles; that is, until his search to hire a chiropractor for the cast, as was his custom in each city they visited, led him to Dr. Stoxen, a chiropractor who had developed a solid reputation among people in show business and was able to help him. At first, Field protested when Stoxen examined him and predicted that he was on the verge of a physical collapse. Stoxen asked him to remove his shoes and socks, and, after watching him walk, was able to pinpoint all of his aches and pains and the reason behind them: His spring mechanism was jammed! After 15 hours of treatment Field’s spring mechanism was restored, as was his career, which ignited his praise for the chiropractic profession. One month later, Anthony and The Wiggles performed 12 consecutive sold-out shows in Madison Square Garden – pain free. In his newly released memoir, How I Got My Wiggle Back, he recounts his struggles and road to recovery. (A video overview by Field, found by clicking here, was played at the Association for Chiropractic Colleges-Research Agenda Conference in March.)

Majidi points out that the importance of this “new and thorough way of looking at the human body,” as well as the attention it has received from the medical community, have not escaped the notice of the Foundation for Chiropractic Progress (F4CP), which recently named Anthony Field as one of its new spokespersons for 2012. Kent Greenawalt, chairman of F4CP, stated in the organization’s March 1 press release that Field’s story “will positively affect the many individuals who will begin to recognize the value of chiropractic care.” Already, Field has told his story of this drug-free approach the chiropractors used, and the results that changed his life on more than 30 network news stations including ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX, CNN and the Today Show. In addition, How I Got My Wiggle Back was mentioned in the April 2 issue of People magazine.

Dr. Amir Majidi DC

In his role as research assistant for Team Doctors, Majidi conducts online searches through National Institutes of Health and Medline to assist Stoxen in preparation for lectures. He just returned from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, where he assisted Dr. Stoxen with his presentation “The Inflammation- Depression Connection.” He has been invited to assist Dr.Stoxen with workshops and presentations at medical conferences in Bangkok, Bali, and Shanghai in the fall.

“I’m not an expert. I’m still developing,” says Majidi. “My number-one goal is to keep chiropractic advancing.” A resident of Toronto, Canada, since the seventh grade, when his family emigrated from Dubai, UAE, he adds, “I’m proud to be from NYCC, and I want to help anyone who is interested.” So far as he knows, he may be the only Canadian to approach chiropractic from the Human Spring Theory. Majidi plans to return to Toronto after graduation this fall and become affiliated in some way with Team Doctors. In the meantime, he has adopted his youthful mentor’s practice of treating and advising patients by this approach. “Dr. Stoxen is 50; he runs barefoot five miles, three times a week, and is pain-free,” he says admiringly. “I want to be that way when I’m 50 years old!” It looks like Majidi’s puzzle is close to being solved.

 

 

Video Tutorial #133 Circle Walk, Jog, Run And Sprint

    Modern society has removed the twists and turns out of our daily life. We walk on sidewalks, roadsides, hallways and treadmills. We no longer have as much uneven terrain to stimulate the receptors, which help with the balance of strength in the sides of our foot stabilizers. This exercise is excellent for redeveloping […]

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Circle Walk, Jog, Run and Sprint

 

Modern society has removed the twists and turns out of our daily life. We walk on sidewalks, roadsides, hallways and treadmills. We no longer have as much uneven terrain to stimulate the receptors, which help with the balance of strength in the sides of our foot stabilizers.

This exercise is excellent for redeveloping the muscles, which have atrophied due to a lack of use.

Circle walk, jog, run and hop

An exercise you can do to strengthen the spring suspension system muscles is Circle Walk: (see pictures above and video above)

Use cones to outline a circle about 12 feet in diameter. Walk the circle at a normal pace, making sure your pelvis is directly over , or in front of your foot as it lands. As you pick up speed, lean in. Once you complete a desired number of laps in one direction, head the other way. Tighten the circle first to eight feet, then five. Ensure that you do not land your foot heel first with each step.

Excerpt take from the book, How I Got My Wiggle Back, page 158, When you walk the force is about one to two times your body weight, and when you run it’s three to five times. Plyometrics – those impact exercises- can be even greater.

To strengthen your unlocked spring mechanism we are going to initially focus on creating resistance through using your body weight to generate relatively low levels of force.

 

foot moving in various directions

 

The drills concentrate on moving in multiple directions (side to side, zig-zagging, circles) to challenge spring suspension system muscles that often become weak because we don’t vary our movement. We move in a straight line too much-on a flat footpath, a treadmill, or a stairmaster- and my doing so only exercise the foot spring suspension muscles in the front and back, not on the side and elsewhere.

Another various of the circle run are ‘Circle Run Cone Touch’ exercises as seen in the video below:

This next exercise routine repeat the strengthening technique but add speed and impact.

Excerpt taken from the book, How I Got My Wiggle Back, page 168, Remember to land on your midfoot or forefoot and spring off the ground; don’t bang your foot down in the landing/takeoff. You’ll be surprised how aerobically challenging these drills are. Our bodies are siply not accustomed to moving this way.

Dr. James Stoxen demonstrating a circle run

 

Circle Jog, Run, Spring:

Lean in as you jog steadily around the circle markers. Accelerate to a run and finally a sprint, leaning further in the faster you move. This accentuates the angle of the foot landing, stressing the spring suspension muscle group.

To learn more about circle runs, Dr. Stoxen will demonstrate and explain in Video Tutorial #170, click here

Circle Walk, Jog, Run And Sprint is one drill you can do to challenge the foot and exercise it in another direction beside front to back

USA TODAY – Wiggles Founder, Anthony Field and Dr. James Stoxen DC Appear In The Champions of Chiropractic, Advertorial In USA Today

      Hi Friends, This is the article that appeared in the USA Today Newspaper on Thursday, April 26th, 2012 while I was lecturing in Malaysia. I finally got a copy. The Champions of Chiropractic is an appropriate title for Anthony Field, a champion for children, treated by Team Doctors, Treatment and Training Center […]

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Dr. James Stoxen DC

 

 

Hi Friends,

This is the article that appeared in the USA Today Newspaper on Thursday, April
26th, 2012 while I was lecturing in Malaysia. I finally got a copy.

The Champions of Chiropractic is an appropriate title for Anthony Field, a
champion for children, treated by Team Doctors, Treatment and Training Center of
Champions.

Working with Anthony Field has been a very rewarding victory!

Huge thanks to the Foundation For Chiropractic Progress for making this happen.

 

Dr Stoxen

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Interview Of Dr. James Stoxen DC By Chris Russell On “RunRunLive Podcast Episode 220″

Interview Of Dr James Stoxen DC By Chris Russell On “RunRunLive Podcast Episode 220″ April 13, 2012        Listen to the Podcast Below   Intro: Hello and welcome to the blue grass of Kentucky podcast, where the grass isn’t really blue, but it is a very comforting shade of green.  From the air […]

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RunRunLiveInterview Of Dr James Stoxen DC By Chris Russell
On “RunRunLive Podcast Episode 220″ April 13, 2012 

 

 

 

Listen to the Podcast Below

 

Intro:

Hello and welcome to the blue grass of Kentucky podcast, where the grass isn’t really blue, but it is a very comforting shade of green.  From the air coming into Lexington much of it looks like a high-end golf course, without greens or sand traps. There is a meandering river that has carved itself into the landscape and you can see the layers of clay rock, the bed of some ancient ocean, on the steep bluffs. But, as you get closer to the city the bucolic scene resolves itself into the usual ordered sacks and rows of suburban sprawl that wraps around all out cities.

But I digress.  This is the RunRunLive Podcast. And, for now, this is Chris your host, and we have a great show for you today.

We chat with an interesting dude, Dr. James Stoxen who will enlighten us on many interesting things from his role as doctor to performing artists, including some relevant revelations that may help you with your running, or at least your wiggling.

It’s a long interview so the other segments will probably shrink to fit – good news for you less of me talking.

Interview:

Chris: You’re telling me your Broadway stories, so what’s your official role there? You’re doctor to the stars there? Why don’t you introduce yourself and tell us

Chris Russell from RunRunLive

Chris Russell from RunRunLive

what you’re doing.

Dr. Stoxen: I didn’t really get into the profession and say “Gee, I’d like to be the doctor to the stars”, it sort of happens organically. In the first 6 years of my practice my passion was sports.

What I wanted to be was not only a doctor for the greatest athletes, but I also wanted to train them as well. So, the best thing to do is get out there and meet them. So early on, I volunteered myself, as a doctor for any and all sports competitions, track and field or powerlifting meets, weightlifting competitions, Olympic lifting, rhythmic gymnastics, anything I could do to get myself in front of these top athletes and coaches.

I did maybe 60 national world championships before my 30th birthday. What I’ve found is that doctoring is a two-way street in sports. You have some great knowledge of anatomy and how to take care of people and some good principles, but the athletes and top coaches also have some great knowledge like plyometrics, weightlifting, technique, form, running technique, and biomechanics that they’ve learned, they will share with you.

So, while you’re doing a history, the questions you are asking are to find out what is wrong with the patient–at the same time you’re asking questions that are loading up your knowledge base on what they can teach you. And then you gain that knowledge which not only helps you treat that athlete better but you can take it with you.

Chris: Sure, yeah, I do the same thing in business. We call it “discovery”, you learn so much from your clients.

Dr. Stoxen: Yes, when you start to think that you know everything, that’s when you really figure out that you don’t know everything. So, you have to have an open mind. If you don’t, you’re never going to absorb some new information that may help the next patient or enhance yourself. So I keep an open mind.

Chris: So somewhere along the line you got invited to do not only sport events, you got contracted to be the on-site doctor for top entertainers and that sort of thing too. That’s kind of cool.

Dr. Stoxen: Well, what happened was, I think it was back in 1993. I got a call from an agent in New York that had asked me if I would go work for the Michael Bolton tour.

I said, “well how does this work” and she said, “show up at this theatre, take care of these people, and I’ll call you tomorrow”.

So I did my thing and they called me and said “well, that was really great, you did a great job, and I’d like to call you again”. Next thing I know, 130 tours later, I had worked for quite a few very well-known entertainers.

And so it’s been quite an interesting experience and it’s kinda funny that you are driving down the road and half of the songs that you listen to are your clients. It’s a great experience and of course it makes practicing more interesting, I guess.

Chris: yeah, so it’s funny because you don’t necessarily think of some of these folks as athletes, but you’re always hearing on the news “Mick Jagger hurt his back” cause they’re out two, three, four, five, six times a week for two and one half hours jumpin around on stage. So, they must get a lot of the same injuries.

Dr. Stoxen: Well, in my practice I’m not really treating ONLY injuries. Most work done on performers is done to improve performance.  Touring is uncomfortable so it takes its toll on your health, energy and attitude.

Lets just say that if you’re in a tour bus, then you’re sleeping in a coffin space, which is what these spaces are. You’re talking about 12 coffin sized spaces that these people sleep in for 10 weeks in a row when they’re on tour, sometimes 2 years. So it’s really uncomfortable.  You’re walking on really hard surfaces and backstage is cold at times.

There’s a lot of stress because you can’t talk to any new people. Mick Jagger can’t walk up to a 7 eleven, get a bite to eat, and have a chat with someone. It’s kind of stressful talking to the same people every day.

So, all that physical and mental stress builds up and your body breaks down.

The other thing is that you have these unusual sleep patterns. They’re in long bus rides for ten to twelve hours straight, going from one side of the country to the other. It beats you up.

You’ve got 115-170 people on an average tour. They’re unloading trucks with big pieces of steal to build the stage or putting big racks of guitars up on ramps and pushing them up. Somebody is going to get stiff and somebody is going to get hurt.

So, if you’re working a tour, you’re working twelve hours a day from–lets say 4:00 p.m. to 3 or 4 in the morning. And you’re just doing constant body work to tune people up, as well as taking care of injuries because, injuries don’t stop when you hit the tour, right?

Chris: Right, that’s so interesting. So, do you find that some of these folks who are on tour have figured out that if they do a little bit of proactive exercise, they’ll end up having substantially more endurance and toughness?

Dr. Stoxen: Yes, you know for instance, Anthony Field, the founder of the Wiggles, children’s entertainment group, did minimal exercise while he was on tour for the first 20 years. Of course, we put an end to that when I started working with his tour in 2004.

First, I worked with him to help put his body back to a more normal state alleviating the pain and resetting his human spring mechanism.

What I told him was, “we need to get together an exercise program”. so I put together a booklet of training exercises . I flew out there and showed him how he could get a pipe backstage and put it up backstage and do hanging ab exercises.

Then, I showed him how he could run in various patterns such as zig zag and circle runs to develop his muscles. All of the exercises could be done from any where he wanted. It could even be a hotel. Eventually they hired a full time trainer to travel with them.

Chris: Is this the ‘Wiggles’ guy? I don’t know much about the ‘Wiggles’.

Dr. Stoxen: Right, well if you have a child who was between one and seven years old in the last 20 years in the United States or Australia, and you don’t know who the wiggles are, you’ve pretty much been living under a rock.

They have a hit television show that goes out to about 100 countries. They also have a live concert that they do for 7 months out of the year. Over a million people each year buy tickets to see this live show.

Chris: It’s very physical too, right? They’re doing a lot of jumping around and dancing, right?

Dr. Stoxen: Well, originally when I first started working for them, they were doing some dancing. Simple dancing, but not really acrobatics because anthony is kind of the leader of the group.

He was very broken down with chronic pain, chronic fatigue, and fibromyalgia. He had all this inflammation from head to toe that kept fueling this clinical depression that set him back emotionally. So, he was just happy to get the shows over with.

They do two shows a day unlike other people. So, it’s kind of grueling to do two shows a day. And they’ll do four shows on weekends.

In fact, in 2004, they sold out 13 shows in a row at madison square garden in one week.

Chris: So, you fixed this guy and you wrote a book on the process of getting fit?

Dr. Stoxen: Well, actually, in 2007 I had given him this powerpoint list of exercises to do, plyometrics.

“Where did you get this from” he said. I said, “Well that’s a book i’m writing”. He said, “I want to write a book”. I said, “alright, I’ll help you write it. What do you want to write about?”. And he said, “I want to write about how you helped me”.

I was kind of shocked, because that has never happened before. I didn’t think it was a very big deal at the time.

So, he wrote the book with Greg Truman. I had to work with Greg to give them an idea of how this approach that I used to help him worked. It is called the Human Spring Approach.

Chris: And this is where we’re get back into running. This stuff goes into the current thinking on minimalist or barefoot running, and treating it as a spring as opposed to a lever. What was your epiphany there?

Dr. Stoxen: This all came about organically.

The way that this all came about is I was working with a man by the name of Ed Coan who pound for pound was the strongest man in the world. Squatting 950-1,000 lbs. in competition.  He is an unbelievable athlete that people admired all around the world.

I remember watching him do these squats in the world championships and saw his face turn blue and his blood vessels exploded in his back.

I thought to myself, ‘what a massive amount of weight to put on your human body’! He was corkscrewing into the hole. I thought what we should do is start from the bottom to release every muscle in your body from the bottom up. That was back in 1986.

I was not so sure what I was doing at the time, but it worked. He broke world records 6 years in a row after that and did not sustain an injury even with that heavy lifting.

At the time I was doing this with him I thought why not do this with my patients?

They should have the best care as well. People would come in with herniated discs or saying they needed surgery. I would start from the bottom and work my way up giving them the maximum improvement that I could give.

If you look at a disc it’s actually a compression spring when your foot hits the ground the weight above the disc actually compresses the disc and changes it’s physical shape. It stores energy with the deformation process within that disc.

When you lift the foot off of the ground it releases the pressure off of the disc and releases the energy back into the system. So that is the definition of a spring. In fact the entire body does that when you impact with the ground.

The mass or the force of the landing impacts into the kinematic chain or what I call the 7 floors of the spring. It stores energy within that mechanism then releases that energy reforming back to it’s exact original shape.

We call this in physics, ‘elastic deformity’ instead of ‘plastic deformity’.

Chris: Sure

Dr. Stoxen: I was looking for a title of this book I was writing and I looked up the word ‘spring’. I found all of the engineering definitions of spring.

WHAM, thats when I got the epiphany.

Because if you find it is proven in physics for 300 years, how two objects collide and how they are able to absorb and rebound from the forces of the impacts through these spring mechanisms. The human body and the earth are objects that collide.

How do they sustain 250 million impacts with the ground without getting completely destroyed is because either they are built with a spring between the two colliding parts or one of the parts is actually an integrated spring itself.

That is when I figured out the human body was a spring mechanism and not a lever system. Lever systems can’t protect you from 3.6 million impacts with the ground. This is an average of how many impacts we have each year with the earth.

Chris: So even with the lever system your still transferring the energy in the basic physics it’s just more abrupt.

Dr. Stoxen: Lever systems can’t protect you from that many collisions. A lever system is not a protective mechanism. It’s also not a recycling mechanism.

Chris: yes that’s my point. There is a conservation of energy in the spring that your not going to get on a direct impact.

Dr. Stoxen: Right, the way you can prove it is with mathematics and thats what we would like to do. We would like to use principles in mathematics to prove that a model is either a. a lever system or be a spring mechanism.

So if I say that I want you to go up on your toes as many times as possible doing toe raises. You could probably do about 100 until your calves start to scream and you get tired.

If you weigh 180 lbs times 100 thats 18,000 lbs of force that you are lifting with your muscles and if you decided you wanted to run a 10k thats 6,000 impacts with the ground times 180 it’s probably close to 4-5 million lbs that your body is resisting.

So how can you explain like 20,000 or 30,000 vs. 4-5 million before you give out with exhaustion.

It’s because the body doesn’t ambulate through muscle contraction as much.

It’s assisted by the muscle contraction but primarily it’s ambulating through bouncing off of the ground or spring mechanisms rather than muscle contracted lever systems.

Chris: So how do you take your science based hypothesis and apply it to practical running form?

Dr. Stoxen: The way you apply it is through Hooke’s Law Of Physics.

This states that the deeper that the spring is able to depress or deform itself the more force it can protect you from and the more energy it gives back. Thats the recycling of the energy as well as the impact force that the human body can withstand.

You can also look at Newton’s simple law it’s mass times acceleration equals the force. So the mass never change your body is always the same weight.

When you running and you apply hooke’s law you will be able to run faster. If you spring mechanism isn’t able to withstand the forces of the landings then thats when you will run into injury.

With multiple impacts of the landings that greater than what the spring can handle.

Chris: Is your point to condition the spring mechanism with specific stretches and exercises specific to that knowledge of the spring mechanism?

Dr. Stoxen: The exact formula is number one is to release the tension on the spring mechanism so it can take up a deeper or greater force of the landing. so essentially what your doing is a gait analysis to determine if the body is bouncing off the ground or banging into the ground.

The nuances between those two is it sort of bouncing?

Can we get it to bounce better?

If it’s banging then we should stop running because the force of the landings will start to deteriorate the mechanism causing muscle spasms in the body that actually stiffen the spring even more making the ability to take up the force of the landings more difficult.

What we know is the human foot and ankle has 33 joints.

The mass is spread across these 33 joints to allow a smooth impact with the ground. If anyone of those 33 joints are locked or stiff then we won’t be able to absorb the force of the landing as well. Part of the examination is to do a little wiggle test or what we call ‘joint play evaluation’ of all 33 joints of the foot.

What I have found is that the metatarsal cuneiform joint  and the ankle mortise are where the majority of the locking occurs. Or the middle of the arch foot mechanism in the mid foot area mostly the second and third toe. So if your wiggling your toes, you can look at the second and third toe and see if they are stiff or locked. You can apply deep tissue techniques and stretching of the foot in three dimensional space. As well as adjustments.

When I do adjustments of the foot just like your spine or knuckles, the joints actually make a cracking noise like adjustments of the back. You can also feel a release of tension in those joints that is immediate after the adjustments.

Step 2 is to strengthen the spring suspension system. If you google image tibialis posterior or peronial muscles your going to find that these muscle attachments or origin and insersion. They actually attach on strategic points around the metatarsal cuneiform or the mid foot and they loop around the ankle bone to the attachment underneath the calf area and they actually suspend the arch from above.

The foot is actually a suspension system. When the weight is applied to the foot on impact it stretches the suspension muscles like an extension spring. Storing energy in the extension spring.

When you push off it releases that energy and hopefully you can maximize the efficiently of the mechanism by getting it as elastic as possible. So you take advantage of tendon energy release through the snap back.

Chris: Right because your tendons are kind of springy anyhow

Dr. Stoxen: Well the tendons are what gives you the most efficiency, speed and power. Thats what the scientists in Russia, specifically Yuri verkhoshansky determined in his research.

Many have duplicated this research by studying impact times with the ground doing depth jumps and plyometric type movements where the least amount of impact time creates a greater tendon and connective tissue strengthening as opposed to a shorter impact time which causes a plastic deformity of the tendons rather than a strengthening.

By strengthening the suspension system it will be able to handle more impacts. Greater amounts of force.

Step 3 - is putting impacts into the mechanism. This is where some medicine would disagree with this. They don’t understand that the body is a spring. Athletics collide and have mis understandings.

That is that doctors sometimes say that running is bad for you and obviously barefoot running can’t be good for you. It just doesn’t seem right. and that you shouldn’t do aerobics and this type of thing.

So how is it possible to have one school of thought that says plyometrics is the ultimate way to strengthen this impact resistance mechanism then doctors on the other hand say it’s wrong.

Thats where the misunderstanding about human spring will clear up these mysteries. That says that if the human spring mechanism is in tact then impacts are good because once you take up the impact into the mechanism you’ll have that normal adaptation response which makes the mechanism stronger but if the mechanism is locked or stiff then the force of the landing when you take it up into that stiff spring mechanism then it causes more of a bang force into the body. you have a reverse adaptation because the body does not like it and goes into spasms and further locks the mechanism and it gets worse.

So thats where the human spring model of approaching the body clears up a lot of mis understandings between medicine and sports.

Chris: Okay that is deep. Give me two things with the layman level in 50 words summary of what your proposing people do for their health and how can they get more information on what we have talked about?

Dr. Stoxen: People need to be careful on what advice they are given. It should be based on principles not what they think is right. If you are putting a cast on your arm or any binding device on the body then the part is not able to move the way it was engineered to move. That will only cause abnormal motion, stress and strain, wear and tear on the body, release of inflammation and of course aging and pain.

If you bind the device or body part then you won’t get the positive adaptation response that makes the body part stronger.

So if your trying to barefoot run but your wearing a binding device on the foot it’s just like a kid taking a cast off a broken arm and then trying to do arm curls.

You just won’t be able to do it. If your going to try to barefoot run you will need to release the spring mechanism completely.

I spend 30 minutes a day before I go out for my run ensuring my mechanism is released so I can take maximum force into my body while barefoot running say 6-7 miles at 3/4 speed.

If your wearing shoes all day the shoes will alter your foot. Even if you have a perfect spring and put a binding device on your feet all day standing for 10 hours at your job the spring will have to be stretched and released. The maintenance is required in order to prepare your body for the sport.

Form and Technique is essential. If your a gymnast on a balance beam 4 feet off the ground trying to perfect your form and technique so it gets better. Your not listening to music, or talking to your friends or looking around the gym. Your paying attention to what your doing and your on the balance beam with your bare feet.

It’s the same thing with barefoot running. You have to pay attention to what your form and technique is about. Practicing every step to make sure the memory of that movement is stored in the brain so that your technique does not get off track this will prevent injuries.

My team is loading up 300 video tutorials from lectures I have given around the world. Anyone can tap into them. They are 1-3 min clips. On a coffee break you can watch them. They are all free and you can learn from everything we are talking about here today in clips and you can take as much as you want in.

Chris: Where can we find them?

Dr. Stoxen: www.teamdoctorsblog.com There are video tutorials to release the spring and interviews with ultimate fighting champion Andre’ Arlovski, Pit Bull from the UFC, slow motion videos of barefoot running, interviews with tykwando champion, Christian Medina, who used barefoot running as a way to prepare for the olympic trials. There is some great content there and if you like it comment on it or reach out to me with an email at teamdoctors@aol.com, sign up for the updates to see new content we are putting on. I’m really excited about it. 

Chris: I can tell your very passionate about what your learning. That is great! I am going to have to let you go as we have run out of time.

Dr. Stoxen: Thank you so much for the interview and yes i’m passionate about it. Your doing a great thing the interviews are very good.

Chris: Thank you very much and we will see you out there.

Dr. Stoxen: Thanks a lot and talk to you soon

Chris’ Podcast, RunRunLive is available on iTunes and at www.runrunlive.com

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