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Chondromalacia Patella / Cracking Knees or Runners Knee, Treatment and Prevention Tips from The Barefoot Running Doctor

Chondromalacia Patella ICD-9 733.92 Chondromalacia Patella / Cracking Knees or Runners Knee, Knee Cap Pain! Treatment and Prevention Tips from The Barefoot Running Doctor Tips For Better Health Ask the doctor, Dr James Stoxen DC Do you experience knee pain when running? Do you have knee pain when bending? Does your knees crack when going up the […]

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Chondromalacia Patella ICD-9 733.92

Chondromalacia Patella / Cracking Knees or Runners Knee, Knee Cap Pain! Treatment and Prevention Tips from The Barefoot Running Doctor

Tips For Better Health

Ask the doctor, Dr James Stoxen DC

Do you experience knee pain when running?

Do you have knee pain when bending?

Does your knees crack when going up the stairs?

You may have what athletes call Runners Knee, what non-athletes call Cracking Knees and what doctors call, Chondromalacia Patella.

I have found the usual cause of this infra patellar pain is an abnormal foot plant.

To view the original post, click here

Question:

I haven’t run in weeks and i decided to go out for a jog. Ended up doing 5k and giving up before my knee gave out.
Should I be running that much? Maybe i should be doing 1k a day and start building up?
What do you think is the best way to recover from this? And to eventually raise mileage to marathon training. (in long future of course)

Dr. Stoxen’s Answer:

patella pulley example

I’m assuming you are talking about pain under, below or around the knee cap. This can be called chondromalacia patella or cracking knee. You may hear it crack or click more often when you go up the stairs.

As you know, the patella is a pulley mechanism (see picture to the right). The trochlear groove is the concave surface where the patella (kneecap) makes contact with the femur (thighbone). Also called the ‘trochlea’.The foot adjusts for the impacts of running with two main spring mechanisms:

1. The Arch Leaf Spring – There have been studies on the arch with all muscles removed leaving just the bones and ligaments. These were extracted from               cadavers. What the study showed was that the arch complex itself has the ability to spring back forces without the aid of the muscles.

“If any of these 33 joints are locked then the foot cannot absorb the impact force smoothly. The foot will either roll into over supination or over pronation to compensate to roll around these locked joints.”,  Dr. James Stoxen DC

2. The Spring Suspension System Muscles – I coined these muscles as the spring suspension system muscles, the landing muscles or the pronation-supination cuff muscles. When this happens the impact is received as a “negative” by the tendons of the landing muscles.

“If any of these muscles and tendons are too weak to handle the impact force, the foot can roll into over supination or over pronation.”, Dr. James Stoxen DC

In my model the body moves as a lever and a spring

The foot rolls from supination to pronation. Have you ever heard of over pronation? That is when the foot rolls too far inward. When this happens, the limb internally rotates on impact. For more information read this article:  What Is Foot Pronation And Foot Supination? Is It Good Or Bad?

Safe and Unsafe Range

That does not put the patella in a good position to allow for stress and strain free motion.

Therefore, if the foot rolls outside the safe range (green-black-green) then the limb rolls in or outside the safe range this causes the knee to be in a position where the knee cap will grind against the pulley mechanism gro0ve (trochlear gro0ve) This can cause irritation to the cartilage, inflammation and pain.

Over Pronated Foot

Not only that but this misalignment of the limb can cause spasms of the muscles from toe to head. The reason is because the body senses the abnormal movement of the limb and reacts with a spasm called a “tonic protective spasm”.

This can lead to various changes in the knee and other joints that make runners uncomfortable and unhappy…..

  1. When muscles spasm on many sides of a joint it cause inhibition of others opposite them called reflexive inhibition. That is a fancy term for shutting down muscles. Sometimes we feel our leg go out from under us in a split second.
  2. Since the abnormal movement pattern starts at the foot and goes to the head it can compress every joint from foot to head. This can cause abnormal internal compressive forces on not only the knee but the arch, ankle, knee, hip and spinal discs.

Internal External Forces Conditions

What we do is a gait evaluation to check how your foot is landing and how it interacts with earth

How does it land…

  1. Does it land with the second toe towards the target, pointing inward or pointing outward?
  2. Does the foot bang when it lands and twist when its lifting off or does it spring down and up?

The intricacies or nuances of how your foot lands during walking or running can be difficult to see when you are moving so quickly. Also, if you have never studied walking or running forms and technique it’s difficult to pick up the details. I still urge you to study your walk and running form and technique so you can get a better feel for how your body is interacting or impacting the earth and how to improve it.

The reason is because your body will impact with the earth 270,000,000 or so times in a lifetime.

  • what shoes you wear outside running training – a poorly constructed shoe can be used for 6 months adding up to 1,850,000 abnormal movements burning the pattern into your brain for a poor landing in running.
  • a stressful time in your life – stress causes people to tense up the entire body leading to more of a bang and twist running impact rather than a spring and roll running impact

How to do your own gait evaluation:

  1. Get a $140 HD flip video camera.
  2. Video yourself walking barefoot 10 steps toward the camera and back. Do this while walking, fast walking, and running.
  3. Download it
  4. Watch the video frame by frame to see how the foot lands and you will see why the patella is not in the groove. It is obvious and enlightening.

Here is a blog post you may like that talks about “foot lock”, which is when joints of the foot are locked causing abnormal movement patterns (compensations) which effect patella position and a lot more! click here to view

Next, I developed a 3 step self-help approach to helping align the foot on impact and improve the spring loading capacity of the limb. The three steps to my human spring approach are:

  1. Release the stiffness or locking of the joints of the spring mechanism so the muscles can pull through full range of motion to maximize development.
  2. Strengthen the pronation supination cuff, landing muscles AKA spring suspension muscles with lever resistance exercises.
  3. Strengthen the pronation supination cuff, landing muscles AKA spring suspension muscles with spring impact exercises.

This three step approach will help you expand the force loading capacity of your human spring to better spring off from impacts, to have maximum performance and reduce risk of injury.

In running as you know there is simplistically the “take off” and the “landing”

When you run with braces (shoes), your body has an artificial support and an artificial landing gear that most think will keep the foot centered. You know that the muscles to do that.

This is what is unique and cool about barefoot running training is:

  1. When you are barefoot running you aren’t copping out on strengthening by putting a brace on your foot to try to hold it in the safe range like a motion control shoe or an orthotic like the doctors who can’t get their runners out of their braces recommend. You really have no choice but to strengthen the landing gear so that the muscles will maintain your foot in the safe range.
  2. When you are barefoot running you don’t have the artificial spring (cushioned sole) to absorb the impact like the doctors who recommend more cushion so you really have to have a springy foot. While it might seem like heavily-cushioned shoes would be the answer, they are in fact, likely doing more damage as they dramatically affect the arch spring’s ability to appropriately absorb, store, then release the energy from each step.
  3. When you train in multiple direction movements you can get your foot in many other landing configurations which stimulate more muscle development through adaptation to create a stronger landing gear.

Rather than strapping five-inch ‘pillows’ to your feet, the best solution is to repair the spring mechanism in the arches by following the procedures and exercises in this article.

Most runners strengthen the take off muscles thinking the artificial support and think that their artificial landing gear (shoe cushion) will do the trick. We all know the majority of injuries occur in the landings

The key is to strengthen the muscles that resist the over rolling of the foot outside the “safe range between supination to pronation (rolling from the outside to the inside) during impacts. If the foot rolls to an unsafe position then the knee rolls to an unsafe position.

 

Logical so far?

 

I call these muscles the landing muscles, the spring suspension system muscles or the pronation supination cuff muscles

 

Introducing…  The Pronation Supination Cuff Training

 

The muscles that prevent over pronation and over supination of the foot consist of the tibialis posterior, tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, and peroneus brevis.

 

The strength of these muscles, supination and pronation as well as the spring suspension system are not covered much in bodybuilding, fitness magazines, training routines etc., but of all the muscles, in fact these are THE most important muscles in the body to work.

Why?

  • These muscles suspend your foot as a leaf spring so it can bounce your body off the ground instead of bang your body into the ground.
  • They store FREE elastic energy when your mass impacts the ground when they stretch. This storage of energy is what allows your body to move more efficiently as a spring mechanism rather than an inefficient lever mechanism.
  • These muscles, which I also refer to the pronator supinator cuff muscles, maintain the foot and lower limb in the safe range between supination and pronation

Below are my last two articles you might find helpful to release the tension on the spring and strengthen the landing gear muscles so that your limb will land straight, spring off the ground with the knee cap and other joints in good alignment with little to no abnormal compressive forces as the goal.

How Does The Body Spring Back Safely From Impacts Of Running and Walking?, click here to view

Self-Tests & Exercises To Reduce Over Pronation and Over Supination From Impacts During Walking and Running, click here to view

I recommend you do the Human Spring release exercises, video tutorials #77 – 89 on my before every run and when you take off your shoes at night, see below:

Video Tutorial #78 Dr James Stoxen DC Demonstrates Self-Help, Deep Tissue Treatment Of The Knee Popliteus Muscle

Video Tutorial #79 Dr James Stoxen DC Demonstrates Self-Help, Deep Tissue Treatment Of The Gluteus Medius Muscle of the Hip

Video Tutorial #80 Dr James Stoxen DC Demonstrates How To Self-Help Deep Tissue Treatment Of The Subtalar Joint Of The Ankle On The Inside

Video Tutorial #81 Dr James Stoxen DC Demonstrates How To Self-Help Deep Tissue Treatment Of The Ankle (Subtalar Joint Outside) 

Video Tutorial #82 Dr James Stoxen DC Demonstrates Self-Help Deep Tissue Treatment Under The Big Toe And Second Toe

Video Tutorial #83 Dr James Stoxen DC Demonstrates Self-Help Deep Tissue Treatment Above The Big Toe And Second Toe 

Video Tutorial #84 Dr James Stoxen DC Demonstrates Scissor Stretching Of The Feet

Video Tutorial #85 Dr James Stoxen DC Demonstrates Stretching Great For Mortons Neuromas And Narrow Heels

Video Tutorial #86 Dr James Stoxen DC Recommends The Best Shoes To Prevent The Foot From Deforming

Video Tutorial #87 Dr James Stoxen DC Demonstrates Self-Help Deep Tissue Of The Ankle Mortise

Video Tutorial #88 Dr James Stoxen DC Demonstrates Stretching Of The Foot While Sitting At Your Chair

Video Tutorial #89 Dr James Stoxen DC Demonstrates A Stretch To Increase The Flexibility Of The Arch Of Your Foot

The key training I do to strengthen my landing gear is run the entire training session in zig zag patterns

Watch this video below to see two time Taekwondo National Champion Christian Medina and Dr. Stoxen run barefoot in zig zag patterns.

I also suggest you read Anthony Field’s book, How I My Wiggle Back.  He is an entertainer who followed my approach and it helped him change his life. The book has over 200 tips for you in the 100 pages of content that are on the Human Spring Approach.

Be sure to check out The Barfoot Runners Society to learn more about barefoot running and find a chapter near you., click here


 

Disclaimer

All content on teamdoctorsblog.com, including without limitation text, graphics, images, advertisements, videos, and links (“Content”) are for informational purposes only. The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical treatment, advice, or diagnosis. Please remember to always seek the advice of a qualified physician or health professional with any questions you may have regarding any medical concerns. Dr James Stoxen DC and Team Doctors does not recommend or endorse any specific treatments, physicians, products, opinions, research, tests, or other information it mentions. Said Content is also not intended to be a substitute for professional legal or financial advice. Reliance on any information provided by Team Doctors is solely at your own risk.

 

  • Fever: When you have a fever, your body is trying to isolate and expel an invader of some kind. Massage increases overall circulation and could therefore work against your body’s natural defenses.
  • Inflammation: Massage can further irritate an area of inflammation, so you should not administer it. Inflamed conditions include anything that ends in itis, such as phlebitis (inflammation of a vein), dermatitis (inflammation of the skin), arthritis(inflammation of the joints), and so on. In the case of localized problems, you can still massage around them, however, avoiding the inflammation itself.
  • High blood pressure: High blood pressure means excessive pressure against blood vessel walls. Massage affects the blood vessels, and so people with high blood pressure or a heart condition should receive light, sedating massages, if at all.
  • Infectious diseases: Massage is not a good idea for someone coming down with the flu or diphtheria, for example, and to make matters worse, you expose yourself to the virus as well.
  • Hernia: Hernias are protrusions of part of an organ (such as the intestines) through a muscular wall. It’s not a good idea to try to push these organs back inside. Surgery works better.
  • Osteoporosis: Elderly people with a severe stoop to the shoulders often have this condition, in which bones become porous, brittle, and fragile. Massage may be too intense for this condition.
  • Varicose veins: Massage directly over varicose veins can worsen the problem. However, if you apply a very light massage next to the problem, always in a direction toward the heart, it can be very beneficial.
  • Broken bones: Stay away from an area of mending bones. A little light massage to the surrounding areas, though, can improve circulation and be quite helpful.
  • Skin problems: You should avoid anything that looks like it shouldn’t be there, such as rashes, wounds, bruises, burns, boils, and blisters, for example. Usually these problems are local, so you can still massage in other areas.
  • Cancer: Cancer can spread through the lymphatic system, and because massage increases lymphatic circulation, it may potentially spread the disease as well. Simple, caring touch is fine, but massage strokes that stimulate circulation are not.Always check with a doctor first.
  • Other conditions and diseases: Diabetes, asthma, and other serious conditions each has its own precautions, seek a doctor’s opinion before administering massage.
  • Pregnancy: No deep tissue work. Be aware: danger of triggering a miscarriage by strong myofascial work is greatest during the first 3 months (especially through work around the pelvis, abdomen, adductors, medial legs, or feet)

Video Tutorial #201 Can You Pass The Foot Ankle Toe Raise Alignment Test? (Posterior View)

  Dr. James Stoxen DC of Chicago IL, USA and  Dr. Amir Majidi Dc of  Toronto, Ontario, Canada April 29, 2012 at a park Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia   Today I am going to help you evaluate if your Human Spring Suspension System muscles are weak by doing the Foot and Ankle Alignment Test. Dr. Amir […]

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Dr. James Stoxen DC of Chicago IL, USA and 
Dr. Amir Majidi Dc of  Toronto, Ontario, Canada
April 29, 2012 at a park
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

The Foot Ankle Alignment Test (back view)

 

Today I am going to help you evaluate if your Human Spring Suspension System muscles are weak by doing the Foot and Ankle Alignment Test.

Dr. Amir Majidi Dc from Toronto, Canada, my research assistant will be demonstrating for you how to execute the test.

This is the sister test to the Foot-Ankle Toe Raise Alignment Test (Front)

Video Tutorial #200 Can You Pass The Foot Ankle Toe Raise Alignment Test? (Front View)

The Foot Ankle Alignment Test (Anterior) and (Posterior) are two of the tests in Anthony Field’s book, How I Got My Wiggle back.  You can get the book from Amazon.com or purchase it at your local bookstore.

Yes, I did these tests on Anthony Field and…  he failed both tests miserably!  

So don’t be discouraged because if you read the book you will find:

Field, the creator and a founding member of the world’s most successful musical groups for young children, The Wiggles, was handicapped by chronic pain, chronic, chronic fatigue, misdiagnosed fibromyalgia and depression during his 20 years on the road.  I am proud to say, I was able to assist him.

It covers our consultation in detail and provides a comprehensive, plain-English explanation of the drug free approach, and the results, that helped him get in the best shape of his life.

Excerpt taken from the book, How I Got My Wiggle Back, page 127, 

The Foot – Ankle Alignment Test (back view), Turn around so your back is facing the mirror. If you can look over your shoulder and see the back of your feet we’ll proceed, otherwise get a friend in here with a camera and get them to take a snapshot of the back view of your legs. Yes, yes I know, it must be a trusted friend.

Draw an imaginary line from the feet, through the heel one, and up to the back of the knees. Again, check to see if it’s straight. 

The above test will give you a good indication whether your arch spring is locked, weak, or stiff. Even if you only have one “issue” it’s quite possible that over time it will start to limit your exercise and daily leisure activities and cause damage to your joints. 

Directions:

  1. Raise up on your tip toes
  2. Try to maintain a proper alignment with your second toe, ankle and shin bone
  3. Try to balance and see how long you can stay in the aligned position
  4. If you cannot maintain straight alignment you failed the test
  5. To see what that means read on….

Dont worry if you failed, because…

  1. I have resistance lever exercises for you to improve to 1x bodyweight strength at the end of this article
  2. I have  impact spring exercises or you to improve to 1.25x bodyweight – 3/4x bodyweight and more impact drills for you to practice at the end of this article

Mild to Moderate Foot/Ankle Misalignment

Pictured above is mild to moderate misalignment of the foot/ankle. This is cause to work on strengthening the spring suspension system muscles.

Moderate to Severe Foot/Ankle Misalignment

Pictured above is moderate to severe foot/ankle alignment which means you should work on strengthening your spring suspension system muscles.

To give you a better idea to compare good alignment vs misalignment I have put the graphic models side by side above. click on the picture to enlarge

If your foot goes out of alignment  and turns out then that means you have a weakness in the spring suspension system muscles.

If one foot can go up in alignment and the other one turns out and cannot go up then you have a weakness on one side.

supportive cuff muscles close- up

The Muscles of the Pronation Supination Cuff

If you look closely at these illustrations of the feet, (If you look closely at these illustrations of the feet, (click here to open a separate page with this diagram to study while you read)) you will see that the pink and purple tendons ( peroneus longus (also known as fibularis longus) is a superficial muscle in the lateral (outside) compartment of the leg.  It acts to counter that abnormal turn out of the leg or evert the leg.

Just look at how the tendon of the peroneus longs (pink tendon) extends under your arch and attaches to your your big toe.   These are the muscles that are not engaging or weak in your suspension system muscle group.

The muscles of the spring suspension system of the foot and ankle consist of the tibialis posterior, tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, and peroneus brevis.

As you can see the peroneus longus coming from the lateral aspect of the foot cross over to add some support to the first ray because this is where the foot usually collapses and locks.

The Peronæus longus also everts the sole of the foot, and from the oblique direction of the tendon across the sole of the foot is an important agent in the maintenance of the arch.

The Tibialis Posterior Muscle

This is the tibialis posterior (blue tendon) that supports the first metatarsal-cuneiform, second and third. You can also see the tibialis posterior (blue tendon) which attaches at the mid-arch  at the first second and third metatarsal cuneiform joints where the spring action happens on impact.

If this joint area is stiff or locked then the tibialis posterior cannot contract maximally against this joint. It’s impossible if the joint is locked.I find this muscle to be the weakest of the cuff.

They even have a syndrome named for it:

Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is the most common cause of acquired flatfoot deformity in adults. Although this term suggests pathology involving only the posterior tibial tendon, the disorder includes a spectrum of pathologic changes involving associated tendon, ligament, and joint structures of the ankle, hindfoot, and midfoot.

Early recognition and treatment is the key to prevention of the debilitating, long-termconsequences of this disorder. Conservative care is possible in the earliest stages, whereas surgical reconstruction and eventually arthrodeses become necessary in the latter stages. The purpose of this article is to review the symptoms, physical examination, radiological examination, classification, and treatment of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. / Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2000;30:68- 77. 

The blue tendon represents the tibialis posterior muscle and tendon.  This muscle stabilizes the arch from the medial aspect.

This test can give you a good evaluation of the strength of your spring suspension system up to your bodyweight ONLY!

It is important to have strength in your foundation to protect your body from impacts as well as help with balance, agility and coordination.

The muscles which support the foot and ankle in this position are the achilles as a primary however the tibialis anterior, tibialis posterior, peroneus longus and brevis stabilize the foot with respect to preventing rotation and lateral motion.

The trick is to test them for how long they can maintain this position to measure “static” strength endurance.

Here is the math:

You are testing the muscles acting on a lever system which is actually 50% body weight force you are lifting as 1/2 of the body on each foot.

  • 50% Bodyweight Foot-Ankle Toe Raise Alignment Test (above) – This evaluates the strength of the muscle groups with 50% of the bodyweight on each limb.
  • 100% Bodyweight Foot-Ankle Toe Raise Alignment Test - You can do a variant of this test that measures the strength and static strength endurance by having them stand on one foot in the same test position
  • 50% Bodyweight Bosu Ball Foot-Ankle Toe Raise Alignment Test - is this same test while attempting to balance your body on a Bosu ball. You cannot use any assistive devices to hold yourself on the ball. You can practice by hanging onto something to practice letting go periodically to challenge your muscles. Its not easy! Ultimately you attempt to do the test, with a straight limb and not a lot of motion.
  • 100% Bodyweight Bosu Ball Foot-Ankle Toe Raise Alignment Test - This is the same test as the one above except with one leg. This is an extremely challenging test that most top athletes have difficulty with.

You are testing the muscles acting as on the body as a lever. So, the forces are no more than 1x bodyweight because there is no movement (walking or running) so no impact.

So what does this mean if you cannot pass the test?

If you cannot do a single Foot-Ankle Toe Raise and maintain proper alignment with 50% of your bodyweight on either limb then we know for sure you won’t be able to walk without your foot and ankle misaligning at the impact point and through the loading of your bodyweight into the human spring.

Why do we know that?

Walking is 1.25 x bodyweight impact force per step.

This is one contraction of 50 % of your bodyweight!

So, if you have conditions related to excessive strain on tissues then that is a sign that your spring mechanism could have fatigued, dropped and locked and/or it is too weak to absorb the impacts by springing your bodyweight off the ground and instead the bodyweight is banging into the ground.

Banging your bodyweight into the ground obviously stresses your tissues more than springing off the ground.

Also springing off the ground is more efficient movement than banging into the ground!

Lets see…

Banging into the ground instead of springing off the ground…  

What is the effect on the body?  

Banging into the ground means little to no protection during impacts and a locked spring which is compressive stress on the weight bearing joints.

This can manifest as any of a number of conditions related to an overstress of tissues or bone such as:

  • plantar fasciitis
  • heel pain
  • heel spurs
  • calf cramps
  • shin splints
  • meniscus tears
  • knee pain and chondromalacia or cracking knees
  • hip pain
  • herniated discs
  • herniated discs that don’t heal

If your body works as a lever instead of a spring due to weakness in the spring suspension system your gait is not as efficient.  You move by pushing your bodyweight instead of bouncing or springing your bodyweight forward burning vital energy.

This is called chronic fatigue!

When you test and train as a lever mechanism, you are getting stronger and able to stabilize your limbs over the foot in the safe range between supination and pronation better during walking.

We call this chronic pain and some doctors can confuse this misdiagnosing your condition as fibromyalgia!

Inflammatory Diseases of Aging

Dont forget, if your body is stiff and sore all over because its locked or too weak to absorb impacts of walking speed or running speeds then your body is accumulating inflammatory chemicals (cytokines) which are damaging to your health if they remain chronic.  Go to the pub med search page and put – cytokines inflammation depression – in the search box and see how many articles come up referencing depression and its connection to chronic inflammation!

If the maximum resistance you can get doing resistance exercises with your bodyweight is 1.0 x bodyweight and impacts of walking are 1.25 x bodyweight you have to add weight to your body when doing resistance exercises or introduce progressively greater impact forces into your spring to strengthen your spring suspension system enough to handle impacts of walking safely.

Running involves using your body as a spring

Walking involves 1.25x bodyweight impact forces which is greater than the 100% Bodyweight Foot-Ankle Toe Raise Alignment Test.  

So the next progression is to do this test while walking checking the alignment of the foot-ankle-shin complex at impact and through the loading of the bodyweight mass into the spring suspension system or mechanism.

I suggest you do this test while being videotaped from the front and back.  Simply walk towards the camera, turn around and walk away from the camera.  Try to walk the second time as fast as you can.

That adds speed to the formula F = M x A which means you are checking the suspension systems ability to maintain the foot in the safe range between supination and pronation at a higher force of impact

How To Train the Suspension System to Handle Greater Impact Forces

If you would like to increase strength of the supination pronation cuff (landing muscles) or spring suspension system muscles then you have to move from training as a lever and begin to introduce progressively greater impact forces.

If you want to train to maintain your foot in the safe range between supination and pronation during impacts such as walking, running and the participation of sports to avoid over pronation and over supination at foot strike you have to train with progressive greater force impacts.

This means you have to start with walking speeds training these muscles in all angles such as inversion, eversion, abduction, adduction, pronation and supination.

F = M x A

So if you understand Newtons Law the force of your impact is determined by your mass x acceleration or speed of running. Since your mass stays the same the way to progressively increase force is to run faster.

I recommend barefoot zig zag runs, side shuffle runs, carioca, ricochet, and lateral bounds, hops, etc

Phase I Release the Spring Mechanism

This involves removing all joint play stiffness and/or locking by releasing locked joints and muscle spasms in the weight bearing joints from head to toe nail.  This is done by hand and I have excellent self help tutorials for you to learn how to do this yourself!

Search for Video Tutorials 77 – 89 to find them or find them on this page where all of my video tutorials are located!  View all video tutorials here… 

 Click the links below to strengthen and supercharge the spring suspension muscles system muscles:

Phase II Strengthening:

Video Tutorial #148 Bosu Ball Foot Training, click here to view 
Video Tutorial #76 Bosu Ball Lateral Step, click here to view
Video Tutorial #177 Side Lunge With Cable, click here to view
Video Tutorial #105 Foot Eversion Exercise, click here to view
Video Tutorial #106 Foot Inversion Exercise, click here to view
Video Tutorial #107 Ankle Exercise Training, click here to view
Video Tutorial # 108 Cable Hip Adduction And Foot Inversion, click here to view
Video Tutorial #109 A Great Hip Adduction Exercise click here to view
Video Tutorial #109 A Great Hip Abduction Exercise click here to view
Video Tutorial #110 Dr. James Stoxen DC loses An abdominal Exercise Competition By One Rep click here to view
Video Tutorial #111 Rectus Abdominal Cable Crunch Pull Downs, click here to view
Video Tutorial #112 Abdominal Oblique Exercise  click here to view
Video Tutorial #176 Improve Your Balance With Half Foam Roll Exercises, click here to view

Phase III Supercharging:

Video Tutorial #149 Figure 8 Runs, click here to view
Video Tutorial #133 Circle Walk, Jog, Run And Sprint, click here to view
Video Tutorial #90 Obstacle Course, Combining Exercise Drills, click here to view
Video Tutorial #136 Double Leg Cone Jump or hop, click here to view
Video Tutorial #137 Why Plyometric Jumping Or Impact Exercises Increase The Level Of Human Performance  click here to view
Video Tutorial # 142 Improve Your Jumping Ability And Supercharge The Human Spring With Speed Bounds, click here to view
Video Tutorial #147 Single Leg Hop, click here to view
Video Tutorial #150 8-Point Step, Lunge, Hop or Bound, click here to view
Video Tutorial #152 Ricochet Box Jump, click here to view
Video Tutorial #167 Side Shuffle, click here to view
Video Tutorial #178 High Skip – Vertical And Horizontal, click here to view
Video Tutorial #179, 45 Degree Zig-Zag Hop, Jump Or Run, click here to view
Video Tutorial #151 Lateral Cone Jumps, click here to view

Learn how to test the front view by viewing
Video Tutorial #200 Can You Pass The Foot Ankle Toe Raise Alignment Test? (Front View), click here to view 

Video Tutorial #200 Can You Pass The Foot Ankle Toe Raise Alignment Test? (Front View)

Dr. James Stoxen DC of Chicago IL, USA and Dr. Amir Majidi Dc of  Toronto, Ontario, Canada April 29, 2012 at a park Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Today I am going to help you evaluate if your Human Spring Suspension System muscles are weak by doing the Foot and Ankle Alignment Test. This is the sister […]

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Dr. James Stoxen DC of Chicago IL, USA and
Dr. Amir Majidi Dc of  Toronto, Ontario, Canada
April 29, 2012 at a park
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Dr. Amir Majidi DC and Dr. James Stoxen Dc

Today I am going to help you evaluate if your Human Spring Suspension System muscles are weak by doing the Foot and Ankle Alignment Test.

This is the sister test to the Foot-Ankle Toe Raise Alignment Test (Posterior)

Dr. Amir Majidi Dc from Toronto, Canada, my research assistant will be demonstrating for you how to execute the test.

The Foot Ankle Alignment Test (Front) and (posterior) are two tests in Anthony Field’s book, How I Got My Wiggle back.  You can get the book from Amazon.com or purchase it at your local bookstore.

Yes, I did these tests on Anthony Field and…  he failed both tests miserably!  

So don’t be discouraged because if you read the book you will find:

Field, the creator and a founding member of the world’s most successful musical groups for young children, The Wiggles, was handicapped by chronic pain, chronic, chronic fatigue, misdiagnosed fibromyalgia and depression during his 20 years on the road.  I am proud to say, I was able to assist him.

It covers our consultation in detail and provides a comprehensive, plain-English explanation of the drug free approach, and the results, that helped him get in the best shape of his life.

excerpt taken from the book, How I Got My Wiggle Back, page 127, The Foot – Ankle Alignment Test (front view), Back to the mirror, please. Stand up straight and do a little jig. OK, that has nothing to do with this test, but it’s always healthy to have a bit of dance.

Right back to it. Draw an imaginary line from your second toe running up through your ankle to your knee. Is the line straight or is it broken around the ankle area? If it’s broken, then the muscles that suspend your arch spring or your foot are probably not strong enough and your spring suspension system could be damaged.

Directions:

  1. Go up on your tip toes
  2. Try to maintain a proper alignment with your second toe, ankle and shin bone
  3. Try to balance

 

Ideal Foot/Ankle Alignment

 

Pictured above is an example of an ideal foot/ankle alignment which will only make your spring suspension system muscles stronger. This is your goal!!!

Mild to Moderate Foot/Ankle Misalignment

Pictured above is mild to moderate misalignment of the foot/ankle. This is cause to work on strengthening the spring suspension system muscles.

Moderate to Severe Foot/Ankle Misalignment

Pictured above is moderate to severe foot/ankle alignment which means you should work on strengthening your spring suspension system muscles.

To give you a better idea to compare good alignment vs misalignment I have put the graphic models side by side above. (click here get a separate page to view while you read)

If your foot goes out of alignment  and turns out then that means you have a weakness in the spring suspension system muscles.

If one foot can go up in alignment and the other one turns out and cannot go up then you have a weakness on one side.

supportive cuff muscles close- up

The Muscles of the Pronation Supination Cuff

If you look closely at these illustrations of the feet, (If you look closely at these illustrations of the feet, (click here to open a separate page with this diagram to study while you read)) you will see that the pink and purple tendons ( peroneus longus (also known as fibularis longus) is a superficial muscle in the lateral (outside) compartment of the leg.  It acts to counter that abnormal turn out of the leg or evert the leg.

Just look at how the tendon of the peroneus longs (pink tendon) extends under your arch and attaches to your your big toe.   These are the muscles that are not engaging or weak in your suspension system muscle group.

The muscles of the spring suspension system of the foot and ankle consist of the tibialis posterior, tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, and peroneus brevis.

As you can see the peroneus longus coming from the lateral aspect of the foot cross over to add some support to the first ray because this is where the foot usually collapses and locks.

The Peronæus longus also everts the sole of the foot, and from the oblique direction of the tendon across the sole of the foot is an important agent in the maintenance of the arch.

The Tibialis Posterior Muscle

This is the tibialis posterior (blue tendon) that supports the first metatarsal-cuneiform, second and third. You can also see the tibialis posterior (blue tendon) which attaches at the mid-arch  at the first second and third metatarsal cuneiform joints where the spring action happens on impact.

If this joint area is stiff or locked then the tibialis posterior cannot contract maximally against this joint. It’s impossible if the joint is locked.I find this muscle to be the weakest of the cuff.

They even have a syndrome named for it:

Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is the most common cause of acquired flatfoot deformity in adults. Although this term suggests pathology involving only the posterior tibial tendon, the disorder includes a spectrum of pathologic changes involving associated tendon, ligament, and joint structures of the ankle, hindfoot, and midfoot.

Early recognition and treatment is the key to prevention of the debilitating, long-termconsequences of this disorder. Conservative care is possible in the earliest stages, whereas surgical reconstruction and eventually arthrodeses become necessary in the latter stages. The purpose of this article is to review the symptoms, physical examination, radiological examination, classification, and treatment of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. / Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2000;30:68- 77. 

The blue tendon represents the tibialis posterior muscle and tendon.  This muscle stabilizes the arch from the medial aspect.

This test can give you a good evaluation of the strength of your spring suspension system up to your bodyweight ONLY!

It is important to have strength in your foundation to protect your body from impacts as well as help with balance, agility and coordination.

Lets understand the importance of this test…   

Just look at how the tendon of the peroneus longs (pink tendon) extends under your arch and attaches to your your big toe.   These are the muscles that are not engaging or weak in your suspension system muscle group.

This can give you a good evaluation of the strength of your spring suspension system.

What

It is important to have strength in your foundation to protect your body from impacts as well as help with balance, agility and coordination.

The muscles which support the foot and ankle in this position are the achilles as a primary however the tibialis anterior, tibialis posterior, peroneus longus and brevis stabilize the foot with respect to preventing rotation and lateral motion.

The trick is to test them for how long they can maintain this position to measure “static” strength endurance.

Here is the math:

You are testing the muscles acting on a lever system which is actually 50% body weight force you are lifting as 1/2 of the body on each foot.

  • 50% Bodyweight Foot-Ankle Toe Raise Alignment Test (above) – This evaluates the strength of the muscle groups with 50% of the bodyweight on each limb.
  • 100% Bodyweight Foot-Ankle Toe Raise Alignment Test - You can do a variant of this test that measures the strength and static strength endurance by having them stand on one foot in the same test position
  • 50% Bodyweight Bosu Ball Foot-Ankle Toe Raise Alignment Test - is this same test while attempting to balance your body on a Bosu ball. You cannot use any assistive devices to hold yourself on the ball. You can practice by hanging onto something to practice letting go periodically to challenge your muscles. Its not easy! Ultimately you attempt to do the test, with a straight limb and not a lot of motion.
  • 100% Bodyweight Bosu Ball Foot-Ankle Toe Raise Alignment Test - This is the same test as the one above except with one leg. This is an extremely challenging test that most top athletes have difficulty with.

You are testing the muscles acting as on the body as a lever. So, the forces are no more than 1x bodyweight because there is no movement (walking or running) so no impact.

So what does this mean if you cannot pass the test?

If you cannot do a single Foot-Ankle Toe Raise and maintain proper alignment with 50% of your bodyweight on either limb then we know for sure you won’t be able to walk without your foot and ankle misaligning at the impact point and through the loading of your bodyweight into the human spring.

Why do we know that?

Walking is 1.25 x bodyweight impact force per step.  

This is one contraction of 50% of your bodyweight!

So, if you have conditions related to excessive strain on tissues then that is a sign that your spring mechanism could have fatigued, dropped and locked and/or it is too weak to absorb the impacts by springing your bodyweight off the ground and instead the bodyweight is banging into the ground.

Banging your bodyweight into the ground obviously stresses your tissues more than springing off the ground.

Also springing off the ground is more efficient movement than banging into the ground!

Lets see…

Banging into the ground instead of springing off the ground…  

What is the effect on the body?  

Banging into the ground means little to no protection during impacts and a locked spring which is compressive stress on the weight bearing joints.

This can manifest as any of a number of conditions related to an overstress of tissues or bone such as:

  • plantar fasciitis
  • heel pain
  • heel spurs
  • calf cramps
  • shin splints
  • meniscus tears
  • knee pain and chondromalacia or cracking knees
  • hip pain
  • herniated discs
  • herniated discs that don’t heal
If your body works as a lever instead of a spring due to weakness in the spring suspension system your gait is not as efficient.  You move by pushing your bodyweight instead of bouncing or springing your bodyweight forward burning vital energy.

This is called chronic fatigue!

When you test and train as a lever mechanism, you are getting stronger and able to stabilize your limbs over the foot in the safe range between supination and pronation better during walking.

We call this chronic pain and some doctors can confuse this misdiagnosing your condition as fibromyalgia!
Inflammatory Diseases of Aging

Dont forget, if your body is stiff and sore all over because its locked or too weak to absorb impacts of walking speed or running speeds then your body is accumulating inflammatory chemicals (cytokines) which are damaging to your health if they remain chronic.  Go to the pub med search page and put – cytokines inflammation depression – in the search box and see how many articles come up referencing depression and its connection to chronic inflammation!

If the maximum resistance you can get doing resistance exercises with your bodyweight is 1.0 x bodyweight and impacts of walking are 1.25 x bodyweight you have to add weight to your body when doing resistance exercises or introduce progressively greater impact forces into your spring to strengthen your spring suspension system enough to handle impacts of walking safely.

Running involves using your body as a spring

Walking involves 1.25x bodyweight impact forces which is greater than the 100% Bodyweight Foot-Ankle Toe Raise Alignment Test.  

So the next progression is to do this test while walking checking the alignment of the foot-ankle-shin complex at impact and through the loading of the bodyweight mass into the spring suspension system or mechanism.

I suggest you do this test while being videotaped from the front and back.  Simply walk towards the camera, turn around and walk away from the camera.  Try to walk the second time as fast as you can.

That adds speed to the formula F = M x A which means you are checking the suspension systems ability to maintain the foot in the safe range between supination and pronation at a higher force of impact

How To Train the Suspension System to Handle Greater Impact Forces

If you would like to increase strength of the supination pronation cuff (landing muscles) or spring suspension system muscles then you have to move from training as a lever and begin to introduce progressively greater impact forces.

If you want to train to maintain your foot in the safe range between supination and pronation during impacts such as walking, running and the participation of sports to avoid over pronation and over supination at foot strike you have to train with progressive greater force impacts.

This means you have to start with walking speeds training these muscles in all angles such as inversion, eversion, abduction, adduction, pronation and supination.

F = M x A

So if you understand Newtons Law the force of your impact is determined by your mass x acceleration or speed of running. Since your mass stays the same the way to progressively increase force is to run faster.

I recommend barefoot zig zag runs, side shuffle runs, carioca, ricochet, and lateral bounds, hops, etc

Phase I Release the Spring Mechanism

This involves removing all joint play stiffness and/or locking by releasing locked joints and muscle spasms in the weight bearing joints from head to toe nail.  This is done by hand and I have excellent self help tutorials for you to learn how to do this yourself!

Search for Video Tutorials 77 – 89 to find them or find them on this page where all of my video tutorials are located!  View all video tutorials here… 

 Click the links below to strengthen and supercharge the spring suspension muscles system muscles:

Phase II Strengthening:

Video Tutorial #148 Bosu Ball Foot Training, click here to view 

Video Tutorial #76 Bosu Ball Lateral Step, click here to view

Video Tutorial #177 Side Lunge With Cable, click here to view

Video Tutorial #105 Foot Eversion Exercise, click here to view

Video Tutorial #106 Foot Inversion Exercise, click here to view

Video Tutorial #107 Ankle Exercise Training, click here to view

Video Tutorial # 108 Cable Hip Adduction And Foot Inversion, click here to view

Video Tutorial #109 A Great Hip Adduction Exercise Demonstrated by WBC Pro Boxing Champion Miguel Macho Hernandez at Team Doctors, click here to view

Video Tutorial #109 A Great Hip Abduction Exercise Demonstrated by WBC Pro Boxing Champion Miguel Macho Hernandez at Team Doctors, click here to view

Video Tutorial #110 Dr. James Stoxen DC loses An abdominal Exercise Competition By One Rep. Watch And see, click here to view

Video Tutorial #111 Rectus Abdominal Cable Crunch Pull Downs, click here to view

Video Tutorial #112 Abdominal Oblique Exercise Demonstrated by WBC Pro Boxing Champion Miguel Macho Hernandez And Fighter Adrian Grenados at Team Doctors, click here to view

Video Tutorial #176 Improve Your Balance With Half Foam Roll Exercises, click here to view

Phase III Supercharging:

Video Tutorial #149 Figure 8 Runs, click here to view

Video Tutorial #133 Circle Walk, Jog, Run And Sprint, click here to view

Video Tutorial #90 Obstacle Course, Combining Exercise Drills, click here to view

Video Tutorial #136 Double Leg Cone Jump or hop, click here to view

Video Tutorial #137 Why Plyometric Jumping Or Impact Exercises Increase The Level Of Human Performance In Athletes and YOU too!, click here to view

Video Tutorial # 142 Improve Your Jumping Ability And Supercharge The Human Spring With Speed Bounds, click here to view

Video Tutorial #147 Single Leg Hop, click here to view

Video Tutorial #150 8-Point Step, Lunge, Hop or Bound, click here to view

Video Tutorial #152 Ricochet Box Jump, click here to view

Video Tutorial #167 Side Shuffle, click here to view

Video Tutorial #178 High Skip – Vertical And Horizontal, click here to view

Video Tutorial #179, 45 Degree Zig-Zag Hop, Jump Or Run, click here to view

Video Tutorial #151 Lateral Cone Jumps, click here to view

Learn how to test the front view by viewing Video Tutorial #200 Can You Pass The Foot Ankle Toe Raise Alignment Test? (Front View), click here to view 


Video Tutorial #90 Obstacle Course, Combining Exercise Drills

Obstacle Course, Combining Exercise Drills This drill actually combines various exercise drills that move the body in different movement patterns such as: Side Shuffle Zig Zag Backward Cone Touches and Circle Runs excerpt taken from the book, ‘How I Got My Wiggle Back’, The drills concentrate on moving in multiple directions (side to side, zig-zagging, […]

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Obstacle Course, Combining Exercise Drills

This drill actually combines various exercise drills that move the body in different movement patterns such as:

Obstacle Course

  1. Side Shuffle
  2. Zig Zag
  3. Backward Cone Touches
  4. and Circle Runs

excerpt taken from the book, ‘How I Got My Wiggle Back’, The drills concentrate on moving in multiple directions (side to side, zig-zagging, circles) to challenge spring suspension system muscles that often become weak because we don’t vary our movement. We move in a straight line too much-on a flat footpath, a treadmill, or a Stairmaster- and by doing so only exercise the foot spring suspension muscles in the front and back, not on the side and elsewhere.

 

Video Tutorial #136 Double Leg Cone Jump or hop

  Double Leg Cone Jumps  excerpt taken from the book, ‘How I Got My Wiggle Back‘, bend at your knees before dropping into a squat. Explode out of the squat upward and to the side. make sure you land midfoot and forefoot. Don’t let the heel touch the ground until you come to a stop. […]

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Double Leg Cone Jumps

Double Leg Cone Jumps

 excerpt taken from the book, ‘How I Got My Wiggle Back‘, bend at your knees before dropping into a squat. Explode out of the squat upward and to the side. make sure you land midfoot and forefoot. Don’t let the heel touch the ground until you come to a stop.

Instructions: Start at the side of an object or cone which you are able to jump over. Jump to the side and land with knees bent.

As soon as you land jump back over to the other side.

Continue jumping back and forth until you get fatigued and or loose form.

Double Leg Hop

Spring Action: This supercharges spring strength and spring power in the adductor and abductor muscles of the lower body

Special Tip: Use your arms for balance. Always land with bent knees. This can be done barefoot or shod

Video Tutorial #167 Side Shuffle

  excerpt from the book, ‘How I Got My Wiggle Back‘, page 170, Stand with your feet slightly wider than a shoulder-width apart and bend your arms at the side. Slide the left foot forward to the right, then step to the right with the right foot. Keep your shoulders over your knees. Change speed […]

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excerpt from the book, ‘How I Got My Wiggle Back‘, page 170, Stand with your feet slightly wider than a shoulder-width apart and bend your arms at the side. Slide the left foot forward to the right, then step to the right with the right foot. Keep your shoulders over your knees. Change speed and direction for fresh challenges.

Repeat 3 times, then reverse, leading with left foot.

side shuffle

Spring Action: This drill develops spring in all levels

Special Tip: You can add speed and directional changes to put positive controlled stress on the supportive structures to develop them.

You can do a variation of the side shuffle in a circle when performing martial arts or wrestling drills.

This exercise should be performed barefoot but can be performed shod.

Video Tutorial #97 On Your Feet All Day? Fatigued? Achy? Over Pronation? I Recommend Footwear with Extended Medial Counters

    Today i’m going to talk about shoes, specifically counters. A counter will help you stabilize or maintain your heel in a safe range in the rolling from supination to pronation. When your foot lands on the ground it starts on the outside and it rolls to the inside and springs off. If it […]

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Today i’m going to talk about shoes, specifically counters.

A counter will help you stabilize or maintain your heel in a safe range in the rolling from supination to pronation.

Safe and Unsafe Range

When your foot lands on the ground it starts on the outside and it rolls to the inside and springs off.

If it starts too far to the outside then it could cause twisting of the leg.

If it rolls too far to the inside then it could also cause twisting of the leg.

Neither one is good. Twisting of the leg is not good, especially when the average person takes 10,000 steps a day or 3.6 million steps per year.

What combats this is a group of muscles that I call ‘The Spring Suspension System Muscles.”

Spring Suspension System Muscles

These muscles are located on the side of the foot going up. So when the foot lands on the ground these muscles gage the rolling and they don’t allow your foot to roll over too far they hold the foot from over rolling. (the tibialis posterior and the tibialis anterior muscles as well as the peroneal muscles) help to keep the foot in the center or in the safe range between supination and pronation.

You may have a weakness in those muscles due to:

  1. Not exercising the foot in different directions from the sides and only walking straight
  2. You might be carrying extra weight which will overload the spring suspension system
  3. Or you might not be exercising at all

Regardless, we can’t get those muscles strong enough in a week or two to reduce the pain from the twisting.

Shoe Safe and Unsafe Range

The counters in the shoes will help to keep that foot from rolling into the unsafe range.

Even if you have strong feet, if you are standing on your feet for long periods of time, fatigue will start to set in and the suspension system muscles will fatigue and drop and lock the spring.

When this happens the suspension muscles will commonly collapse in a predictable fashion inward over too far into pronated position.

The counter helps you from over rolling either way.

The counter should fit right against the heel with no distance between the heel and the counter. It should be snug. (see pic below)

 

Dr. James Stoxen DC explains there should be no distance between the heel and the counter

 

This is the only area where it should be snug.

It should never be snug anywhere else like on the top of the shoe.

If there is too much room between the counter and the heel your foot, it can still roll and collapse because there is nothing holding it in.

Another thing to make note of is if you have an orthotic in the shoe that might be too wide then it might open up the counter and the counter can’t get a grip on the heel to be able to protect it from the over rolling and that would defeat the purpose.

If this is happening TAKE IT OUT.

The way you check the counter to make sure it is firm. Squeeze it like a piece of fruit. If it’s tough and stiff like a piece of plastic then that’s a good counter. Make sure it’s not too flimsy.

I encourage my patients to get good shoes to prevent this over rolling. This helps in the over all treatment to help those muscles get stronger.

Like I said before getting these muscles stronger can’t be done in a week and the counter support will help in the process.

One other thing to take notice is when your buying shoes  you might see a footpad inside the shoe itself. That is good when your buying online to be able to use the foot pads to size the shoe better because everybody has a different size foot and thickness.

But You might want to take one or both out if you can because then you can sink your foot deeper into the counter to get a deeper support base.

Think of this example:

Digging a five foot hole for a flag pole or a seven foot hole for a flag pole.

When the wind hits it, it won’t come out of the ground if it’s deep enough into the ground.

Extended counter shoes are shoes that have an extended counter, which is actually better.

Shoes can be a useful tool if you have weakness. But unfortunately the weakness is caused from wearing shoes. They can be a problem yet they are a necessity.

So buying the right shoes with a good counter support can be very helpful in reducing over rolling of the foot

Video Tutorial # 99 What Is The Best Way To Lace Your Shoes?

    Today i’m going to talk about how to lace a shoe. That might sound kind of strange because most of them are already laced when you get them. You might think the company laces them correctly when you get them but that is not always true. I have a tricky way of lacing […]

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Today i’m going to talk about how to lace a shoe.

That might sound kind of strange because most of them are already laced when you get them. You might think the company laces them correctly when you get them but that is not always true.

I have a tricky way of lacing shoes that will make them fit perfectly, snug and make the shoe a better support mechanism when you need it.

The Proper Way To lace Shoes

 

What we have here is a Drew shoe and it has a lacing system that starts over the top.

When you lace the shoe from over the top it doesn’t allow the leather strapping mechanism to come together so easy when you go over the top on the first lacing.

1. What I do is change that and from the start lace the shoe from underneath. (pictured above) So the first lacing and all of the lacing come from underneath and over.

2. The second thing you might notice is an option or a loop on the top of the shoe. I recommend that you never, ever put that lace through that loop. The reason why I say that is when you pull that tight what can happen is the toe lifts of the shoe.  If this starts to happen then the arch of your foot won’t be able to handle the landings.

The more relaxed the arch of your foot is with less tension the more maximum force it can absorb into the mechanism and spring off the ground for efficiency.

Dr. Stoxen explains the importance of lacing the shoes correctly

 

Once again when you lace the shoe at the top it pulls the toe up even more and the front of the shoe won’t even touch the ground, which keeps the arch reversed and makes the spring mechanism weaker. The other important factor is to lace under and over.

Thats the two tips on lacing I can give you.

Do it with one shoe to compare how it feels with the other shoe.

Dr. James Stoxen DC shares tips on how to lace a shoe properly

Lace all of your shoes this way!!!

Video Tutorial #133 Circle Walk, Jog, Run And Sprint

    Modern society has removed the twists and turns out of our daily life. We walk on sidewalks, roadsides, hallways and treadmills. We no longer have as much uneven terrain to stimulate the receptors, which help with the balance of strength in the sides of our foot stabilizers. This exercise is excellent for redeveloping […]

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Circle Walk, Jog, Run and Sprint

 

Modern society has removed the twists and turns out of our daily life. We walk on sidewalks, roadsides, hallways and treadmills. We no longer have as much uneven terrain to stimulate the receptors, which help with the balance of strength in the sides of our foot stabilizers.

This exercise is excellent for redeveloping the muscles, which have atrophied due to a lack of use.

Circle walk, jog, run and hop

An exercise you can do to strengthen the spring suspension system muscles is Circle Walk: (see pictures above and video above)

Use cones to outline a circle about 12 feet in diameter. Walk the circle at a normal pace, making sure your pelvis is directly over , or in front of your foot as it lands. As you pick up speed, lean in. Once you complete a desired number of laps in one direction, head the other way. Tighten the circle first to eight feet, then five. Ensure that you do not land your foot heel first with each step.

Excerpt take from the book, How I Got My Wiggle Back, page 158, When you walk the force is about one to two times your body weight, and when you run it’s three to five times. Plyometrics – those impact exercises- can be even greater.

To strengthen your unlocked spring mechanism we are going to initially focus on creating resistance through using your body weight to generate relatively low levels of force.

 

foot moving in various directions

 

The drills concentrate on moving in multiple directions (side to side, zig-zagging, circles) to challenge spring suspension system muscles that often become weak because we don’t vary our movement. We move in a straight line too much-on a flat footpath, a treadmill, or a stairmaster- and my doing so only exercise the foot spring suspension muscles in the front and back, not on the side and elsewhere.

Another various of the circle run are ‘Circle Run Cone Touch’ exercises as seen in the video below:

This next exercise routine repeat the strengthening technique but add speed and impact.

Excerpt taken from the book, How I Got My Wiggle Back, page 168, Remember to land on your midfoot or forefoot and spring off the ground; don’t bang your foot down in the landing/takeoff. You’ll be surprised how aerobically challenging these drills are. Our bodies are siply not accustomed to moving this way.

Dr. James Stoxen demonstrating a circle run

 

Circle Jog, Run, Spring:

Lean in as you jog steadily around the circle markers. Accelerate to a run and finally a sprint, leaning further in the faster you move. This accentuates the angle of the foot landing, stressing the spring suspension muscle group.

To learn more about circle runs, Dr. Stoxen will demonstrate and explain in Video Tutorial #170, click here

Circle Walk, Jog, Run And Sprint is one drill you can do to challenge the foot and exercise it in another direction beside front to back

Video Tutorial #177 Side Lunge With Cable

  Side Lunge With Cable Instructions: Place the cable strap around your wrist (waist height) get into a wide stance Go down towards the cable so that it pulls you into a side lunge, then step back up. It’s very important to keep the correct form You can also do this exercise by tying a […]

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Side Lunge With Cable

Instructions:

  1. Place the cable strap around your wrist (waist height)
  2. get into a wide stance
  3. Go down towards the cable so that it pulls you into a side lunge, then step back up.
  4. It’s very important to keep the correct form

You can also do this exercise by tying a band to a machine.

Video Tutorial #175 Barefoot Running? What If I Step On Something? part 2

  As you can see in the video when I was barefoot running on the trail I was meandering around the rocks.  This adds another dimension to the barefoot running. When you are running barefoot you have to watch where you step. This adds an extra dynamic to the ‘running training’ What that means is […]

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As you can see in the video when I was barefoot running on the trail I was meandering around the rocks.  This adds another dimension to the barefoot running.

When you are running barefoot you have to watch where you step. This adds an extra dynamic to the ‘running training’

What that means is if you have shoes on you don’t pay much where you are stepping or the environment. Just running perhaps listening to your ipod and the latest music.

I try to get into the training aspect of barefoot running. Where I can increase my coordination, balance and agility.

Dr. James Stoxen steps around the rocks

When I am meandering around the rocks I have to place my foot around the rock and it might be placed in the position above.

tibialis anterior muscle

My next step I might need to use my balance to go around as you can see in the picture above. (notice the tibialis anterior muscle) I use my balance to keep my body mass over my foot and avoid the rocks.

I don’t ever think of running barefoot on rocks as a negative. I look at it as a positive as an added dimension, variable to improve:

  • Agility
  • Balance
  • and Coordination

 

 

Video Tutorial #174 Barefoot Running? What If I Step On Something?

  Dr James Stoxen DC shares and demonstrates Video Tutorial #174 What If I Step On Something? part 1 Coco Cay, Bahamas November 9, 2011 As the barefoot running doctor one of the first things people ask me is: Aren’t you worried about stepping on something? such as: a piece of glass? a rock? a […]

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Dr James Stoxen DC shares and demonstrates
Video Tutorial #174 What If I Step On Something? part 1
Coco Cay, Bahamas
November 9, 2011

As the barefoot running doctor one of the first things people ask me is:

Aren’t you worried about stepping on something?

such as:

  • a piece of glass?
  • a rock?
  • a syringe? (crazy as if there are syringes all over the place?)

When you are running with shoes on you don’t have to worry so much about stepping on those things but when you are running without shoes on it becomes an extra variable in the running equation. This can be better because it adds another dimension to your run which is called:

  1. Agility
  2. Coordination
  3. and Balance!

When you are running with shoes on you become less aware of your running. Listening to nature or your ipod ect. Becoming less aware of your environment because you have the shoes to

range of motion

protect you.

When you are running barefoot you might see that there are rocks on the street and your looking at those, which causes you to run around them. In the process of running around the rocks or avoiding debris you are not just running straight but strengthening the muscles of your foot by moving your foot around the rocks.

By looking down and ahead of where you are running your eye/feet coordination is being used.

Dodging

Watch me run down the road and dodge the rocks and strengthen my spring suspension muscles.

 

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